Session Schedule

Satisfy your intellectual tastes with a smorgasbord of programming ranging from practical to fantastical, from sensible to nonsensical, from thoughtful to jokester. Indulge old interests or find new ones among these daily listings.

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Session Schedule

Wednesday, July 5

8:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1 & 2)

Colloquium 2017 — The Health Care of Catastrophes: Innovation Driven by Disaster

Catastrophes — from hurricanes to mass shootings to epidemics — present the medical community with care challenges as complex and traumatic as the disasters themselves. Sponsored by the Mensa Education & Research Foundation, this Colloquium will address these health care challenges from the perspective of emerging technology and innovation, as well as evolving policy questions.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Revolt of the Deplorables: The Inside Story of the Greatest Political Upset in U.S. History
Steven Allen

The 2016 presidential campaign pitted one of the best-credentialed candidates ever to seek the presidency against a shoot-from-the-lip billionaire whose followers considered themselves part of a worldwide populist movement. The outcome was the greatest upset in U.S. political history. What happened? In this presentation, based on his forthcoming book Revolt of the Deplorables, Dr. Steven J. Allen tells the inside story of a grassroots rebellion that changed the course of America and the world. Allen has been called a “digital revolutionary” (the National Journal) and “the Tea Party’s editor in chief” (The Daily Beast/Newsweek). He served as press secretary to Sen. Jeremiah Denton and senior researcher in Newt Gingrich’s presidential campaign. Currently, he is vice president and chief investigative officer of the Capital Research Center in Washington, D.C. A former Membership Officer of Metropolitan Washington Mensa, he coordinated MWM’s Politics SIG for 10 years.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

A Prehistory of Music
Christopher Kilgore

Using art, historical images, ethnographic films and archeological materials, Christopher Kilgore will present a compendium of evidence of early musical performance. Beginning at the dawn of the historical period and working backward, Kilgore will address the cultures of ancient Rome, Greece, China, Egypt, Sumer, Africa and Paleolithic Europe. Topics covered will include the development of music theory, vocal performance, the variety of early musical instruments and the origin of dance. Special attention will be given to the most recent scholarship, including unpublished materials.
1:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Settlers of Catan Tournament
Kevin Brawner

Settlers of Catan is a heavy strategy game, where players collect resources and build towns and cities. We will be using the Settlers of Catan Base Game and will play to 10 Victory Points.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Introverted Intuitives: The Top Four Percent
Laurie Nadel

The rarest of the 16 Jungian personality types identified in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Introverted Intuitives make up only four percent of the general population. They are the architects of ideas who live primarily in the internal world of concepts and ideas. In a society that values homogeneity of thinking, IN’s often experience covert prejudice and discrimination in education, social situations and in the workplace. (To wit: “You know what’s wrong with you? You think too much!”) In my corporate and private work, I have worked with more than 1,000 Introverted Intuitives. When IN’s see the "map" of their personalities, they report that this information changes their lives for the better. I will also present the similarities and differences between INs and people with Asperger's.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Ozone Beware: A Science Project and a Floridian Teenager's Journey to Effect Melanoma
Satya Alagarsamy

As our ozone continues to catastrophically deplete, reported cases of melanoma will likely increase. Enter the cancer fighting ablilites of lycopene and its potential to help millions. Using this research as a stepping stone provides a bigger picture of effectively fighting cancer. It opens the door to encourage research of carotenoids as cancer-fighting agents. The applications are immense and help excite a whole new way of treatment for cancer patients around the world.
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Hidden Gems: Historic Sites In Broward County
Roberto Fernandez, III

This presentation will focus on many of the historic sites in Broward County that include pioneer homes, schools and landscapes that are often overlooked by tourist. Scattered throughout the county many of these sites reveal Broward County's contributions to the development of Florida including agriculture, civil rights and military history.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Conspiracy Theories Are for Losers
Joseph E. Uscinski

Why do people believe conspiracy theories? Which conspiracy theories will resonate in society and when will certain groups be targeted with accusations of conspiracy? The speaker draws on data from the internet, newspapers and surveys to show that conspiracy theories are tools of the weak used to balance against power and oncoming threat. Whether conspiracy theorists know it or not, their theories must conform to the current distribution of power to resonate.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Florida's Big Dig: The History of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Jacksonville to Miami, 1881-1935
William Crawford, Jr., Esq.

Bill Crawford provides a detailed account of the development of Florida’s Intracoastal Waterway. As early as 1636, canals began to replace the oxcart as the means of transporting goods in Colonial America. But the Constitution granted no power to fund inland waterways. In 1825, the completion of the Erie Canal ignited America's first canal renaissance. In 1881, Florida began building what would be the southernmost section of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. A private company agreed to construct a small canal in exchange for public land and the right to charge tolls. The election of Theodore Roosevelt as president set off a second national renaissance of waterway construction. More than 30 waterway associations coalesced into national advocacy groups to lobby Congress for funding. Mr. Crawford will also cover how the sale of the private waterway became a federal, toll-free inland waterway and the source of funds for the first psychiatric hospital for children in the nation.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Understanding Surrealist Art
Christopher Kilgore

Beginning primarily as a literary phenomenon, surrealism ultimately became the most influential artistic movement of the 20th century. Intimately affecting the development of abstract expressionism, pop art, magic realism and advertising, surrealism has achieved a level of integration into the modern collective consciousness that is historically unprecedented. Utilizing an extensive slide presentation, Christopher Kilgore will present a survey of surrealist art and illuminate the historical, political, philosophical and psychological context in which it developed, orienting surrealism within the prevailing Modernist cultural context. Numerous surrealist artworks will be analyzed in terms of their stylistic precedents, technical approaches, and thematic elements. Kilgore will also discuss many of surrealism’s greatest artists and the way in which their personalities, relationships, synergies and conflicts influenced the movement's evolution. A syllabus will be provided.
3:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Atheist Meet-and-Greet
Ed You

This atheist, agnostic, humanist, etc. meet-and-greet can be “hosted” by anyone that is motivated to lead the discussions, with Ed You as the default host. This forum is for you, whether you want to discuss atheist reading lists, other atheist groups, the politics of atheism, how religious oppression impedes you from coming out of the atheist closest, or if you simply want to meet others that share atheist/agnostic values.
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Self-Expansiveness: A Transpersonal Construct and Its Supporting Research
Harris Friedman, PhD

Self-expansiveness is a construct referring to how a person can identify with aspects of the world not usually seen in the West as part of the ordinary self. This construct is accompanied by a scientifically well-validated measure, the Self-Expansiveness Level Form (SELF), which has been used in considerable empirical research. In particular, the SELF’s Transpersonal Scale, which focuses on extreme levels of self-expansiveness, such as identifying with all of humanity or even all that exists, provides a model for understanding a number of phenomena related to the outer boundaries of human consciousness. This presentation will explore the construct of self-expansiveness and its accompanying measure, as well as summarize the empirical research supporting it. The many implications of this approach, in terms of both further research and applications, will also be explored.
3:30 p.m. (Great Hall 5)

Learning Session — Roll for the Galaxy
Robert Goldsmith

This game involves rolling worker dice to determine what type of work they want to perform, then assigning them to a variety of tasks that help build your interstellar empire. It’s easy to learn. Join us in the Games Room if you would like to learn the game or the Ambition expansion, or need a refresher before the tournament on Wednesday at 4:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m. (Great Hall 5)

Learning Session — Ticket to Ride
Richard Manno

This is a fun railroad game of low-moderate complexity. Colorful, rewards map/pattern visualization, not difficult to learn, easy to play — but as with many games, mastery is another matter. Join us in the Games Room if you would like to learn the game or need a refresher before the tournament on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Update on Alzheimer's
Elna Tymes

Alzheimer's is one of the top killers of older adults. Progress in developing preventive drugs has been fitful and difficult, but funded research is continuing. Dr. Tymes will talk about her research within a Mensa population and some preliminary findings about high IQ people and whether they develop the behaviors associated with Alzheimer's.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Oil and Gas Foundations and Frac(k)ing: Environmental, Surface Use and Other Issues in Shale Plays
Michael Jewell

The horizontal shale boom that began in 2008 thrust domestic oil and gas production to a level never before anticipated. Apart from the shift in international markets, this paradigm raised important questions related to this new technology: What are the effects of hydraulic fracturing? What is the impact on surface use and encroachment to other developments? What are the implications for federal lands? Is this technology safe and clean? Are state and federal laws equipped to handle these drilling techniques? How do these fossil fuel technologies related to the ongoing green energy movement? This presentation will inform the attendee on the full range of thought of the above questions with an apolitical approach, while presenting thoughtful analysis and context from the unique position of a practicing oil and gas attorney who is also a public health practitioner.
4:30 p.m. (Room 205)

Teen Meet-and-Greet

Meet friends, old and new. Find out who’s at the AG, make plans and catch up with your M Teen peeps!
4:30 p.m. (Room 217)

Friends of Bill W

For Mensans and guests who are actively practiving any 12-step program. This is a non-hosted, informal program, not for observers or the curious, please.
4:30 p.m. (Room 216)

GenY SIG Meet-and-Greet
Henri Buccine-Schraeder

The GenY SIG is for Mensa members born on or between the years of 1976-1996. Come to this session to meet the other "don’t-call-us-millennials" that comprise Mensa. Hear about the super secret AG activities for GenY-aged members, get involved in organized and impromptu shenanigans and learn the location of our very own party suite. (You’ll receive the offial invite at this session.) If you can’t make it, never fear. Approach and introduce yourself to any GenY member at the AG and see if you can get the lowdown. Or you know, just join the Facebook Group GenYMs.
4:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Club Med SIG Meet-and-Greet
Mary Tala

Meet Mensans who enjoy swimming, snorkeling, kayaking, beach volleyball, sailing, hiking and archery.
4:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Roll for the Galaxy Tournament
Robert Goldsmith

Roll for the Galaxy involves rolling worker dice to determine what type of work they want to perform, then assigning them to a variety of tasks that help build your interstellar empire. The tournament will be played in two rounds. Winners in Round 1 will go on to Round 2. Both rounds will use the Ambition expansion. Sign up early! Learn it in the Games Room on Wednesday at 3:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Data Visualization for Everyone: A Truthful Art
Alberto Cairo

Never before has so much data been available to the public. From crime statistics to public school test scores, citizens have the ability to access mountains of data on issues that impact their lives. But having information isn’t the same as being informed. How can citizens use data to identify trends or pinpoint new solutions? In the past two decades, visualization — the graphical display of information — has become a skill as important as literacy or numeracy, as it is arguably the most powerful tool to help us derive meaning from the enormous amounts of data produced daily. Join international expert Alberto Cairo to see this tool at work.
6:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Parents of Gifted Youth Meet-and-Greet
Jamie Uphold

Are you parenting a gifted child? Perhaps you’re interested in meeting other parents doing the same? Parents and Gifted Youth Coordinators are invited to gather for this opportunity to talk. Note: No childcare will be provided for this event.
6:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

GenX SIG Meet-and-Greet #1
Tracey Guice

For Gen Xers who watched as video killed the radio star, and all we could do is stand by and mutter "I want my MTV!" In hopes of finding that we have more in common than just our 2 percent, we welcome all Mensans born from January 1961 through December 1981. This is a group of GenX Ms, by GenX Ms, and for GenX Ms.
6:00 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Registration for the American Mensa Admission Test

Proctors will register candidates for the American Mensa Admissions Test. The special AG test fee is $30. Test candidates must be at least 14 years of age, provide a photo ID and be a permanent U.S. resident. We will be using our new admission test for this session.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

What Senior Terrorists Say About Why They Want to Destroy Our Way of Life
James Mitchell

Beliefs drive behavior. Gain an eye-opening look into the minds of the Islamic terror masterminds seeking to destroy America. Explore their motives and beliefs with the clinical psychologist who, as an interrogator in the controversial CIA Enhanced Interrogation Program, went head-to-head for years with 14 of the most senior terrorists in U.S. custody, including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed — the mastermind behind the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. Learn what they told him first-hand about why attacks by violent Islamists are far from over, and why they view many of our freedoms and protections as weaknesses placed in our minds by God to make it easier for them to conquer us. Examine how the lessons learned from these insights can be used to make us safer.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

The Cuban-American Transition: From Little Havana Exiles to Transnational Expats
Guillermo J. Grenier

Since their initial and, many thought, temporary arrival in the United States after the Cuban Revolution in 1959, Cuban Americans have continued to come to Miami. But the Cubans that came as exiles in the 1960s and the Cuban Enclave of Little Havana are diminishing in number, even as new layers of Cubans establish themselves on the foundations stones set by the earliest arrivals. The new Cuban immigrants did not leave Cuba for the same reasons as the earlier waves and have a different view of how the diaspora should relate to the Cuban people and the Cuban government. This presentation presents some of the key elements of this transition from exiles to transnational expats.
6:30 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

American Mensa Admission Test

Proctors will register candidates for the American Mensa Admissions Test. The special AG test fee is $30. Test candidates must be at least 14 years of age, provide a photo ID and be a permanent U.S. resident. We will be using our new admission test for this session.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Is Waldorf Education the Right Choice for Your Gifted Child or Grandchild?
Dan Punzak

There are some private schools that use an unusual form of pedagogy called Waldorf Education. There are several charter schools and, with the new Washington administration more open to charter schools and educational vouchers, there may be more opportunities for Waldorf schools. Some of the unique features of Waldorf education will be discussed, as well as the basis for its uniqueness.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Eating What You Cook: The Importance of Self-Investment
Matthew Sullivan

Would you eat food from a chef who doesn't even eat what he cooks? Exactly. Matthew Sullivan an innovator in creative networks and popularly known as MC Kenna, will expound upon the essentiality of self-investment, or Eating What You Cook, in the world of entrepreneurship. Constantly revisiting the chef analogy, Sullivan's presentation humorously highlights checkpoints like finding your niche, investing in others and what money really means. Hear it straight from the horse's mouth. At only 18, the young Matthew Sullivan, an information systems student, has founded three businesses: BeautiFlorida, a creative opportunity platform; FloridaRapMerch, a drop-shipping system to help creatives fund their careers; and Connect The Dots, a color-coded networking event that will soon make its way to Texas, Denver, New York and more.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Firehouse Meet-and-Greet
Laura Smith

Whether you love us, hate us, or just love to hate us, you won’t want to miss this year’s Firehouse Meet-and-Greet. Join the Queen of Firehouse, our amazing Boob Czar and her court, and meet the infamous Sobeq Ra and his harem of Bookworm Bxtches! All your favorite vixens and villians will be in the (Fire)house! You might even get a KH selfie, if you’re lucky! There will be no greater celebration of boobs and bacon at the entire AG. You won’t want to miss this! (Program not recommended for snowflakes or SJWs. As always, no rats allowed.)
7:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Ticket to Ride Tournament
Richard Manno

This is a fun railroad game of low-moderate complexity. Colorful, rewards map/pattern visualization, not difficult to learn, easy to play — but as with many games, mastery is another matter. Experienced players only – you can join us for the Learning Session and then play in the tournament. There will be some changes to the standard rules. Playing presenter/referee is elderly and set in his ways.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Weird Florida
Eliot Kleinberg

From cows in the Intracoastal Waterway to haunted airliners to celebrity sex scandals — it all happens in Florida. Is there a weirder state? We say no, and challenge you to prove otherwise. Eliot's comedic delivery and multimedia presentation leave audiences roaring.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

When Philosophy Meets Mathematics
Pedro Suarez

A question has been raised: What is mathematics? What is its nature? Is it invented or discovered? Many mathematicians have approached the question throughout history. The presentation presents a survey of some answers to these questions.
9:00 p.m. (Room 217)

HELL’s M’s Prequel
Beth Weiss

Let's get the party started! Wear your favorite black shirt (or not). We'll share a few announcements, make sure everyone knows where the SIG suite is and get the party underway!
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Glass Paperweights, or How Did They Get That in There?
Didi Pancake

A slide presentation including a brief history of glass paperweights, how they are made and examples from a world-class collection of antique weights.
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Wines of the Street: A Tasting Like No Other
Dave Bryant

If you are a connoisseur of fine wine who marvels in the bouquet of the cork, swirls vintage grapes in crystal stemware before savoring the complex flavor on your sophisticated pallet, this tasting is not for you. These wines have no pretentiousness. There are no vintages, historic vineyards, or awards from royal commissions. You will not find these popular samples offered by the wine steward at any dining establishment in your Zagat guide. These are wines for the common man. Wine for those whose objective is simple: get messed up, as quickly and cheaply as possible. These are the Wines of the Street.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1 & 2)

Mr. Mensa
Nguyen 'Win' Pham

An AG favorite, the annual Mr. Mensa Pageant and Date Auction is proportionate parts prowess, parody and pandering. Join Nguyen 'Win' Pham (Mr. Mensa 2011) in his fifth appearance as pageant host, and come cheer on your fellow Mensan men as they showcase their talents and physiques to compete for the crown. Bring those dollars, checkbooks and major credit cards for your chance to win a seat on the judging panel as well as a date with one (or more!) of the contestants. Proceeds benefit the Mensa Foundation.
10:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Double Deck Cancellation Hearts Tournament — Round 1
Stan Ward

One of the signature games of Mensa and Hell’s M’s, DDCH is Hearts played with seven to nine players and two decks, where a matching card played cancels out the first one for purposes of taking the trick. Lead rotates, no need to wait for hearts to be broken, no score setbacks, no “bucket-O-pain”. If none of that means anything to you, the full rules will be explained; if it does, this variant is often called “guts rules” or “Ohio rules”. Sign up in advance or show up to replace a no-show. One winner from each of eight tables goes on to the final round.

Thursday, July 6

9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Investing in Future Technologies
Will Hepburn

If you would like a peek into the future, join us for this discussion of emerging industries such as nano technology, robotics, stem cell research, the "Internet of Things," 3D-printing and more. All of these technologies promise to radically transform our lives in similar ways. Some are already doing so. This discussion will look at each of these industries and how to invest within them.
9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

The Data Detox: A Diva's Guide to the Social Media Scrub!
Kelly Galanis

Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook – oh my! Chances are, most of you are active on social media sites. You share photos, information, personal details about yourself to people all around the world. With new social sites launching almost daily, it can be difficult to keep track of what’s out there. This workshop will take a look at tips, tricks, and tools to scrub your social media clean. We’ll review ways to update your privacy, clean your "breadcrumb" trail, and remove data about yourself that you no longer want online. It’s time to get rid of the old — like that MySpace account still hanging around — and embrace the new. (Live videos, anyone?) You’ll leave with a solid understanding of how to take control of your online presence and manage your image with confidence and flair!
9:00 a.m. (Room 217)

Friends of Bill W

For Mensans and guests who are actively practiving any 12-step program. This is a non-hosted, informal program, not for observers or the curious, please.
9:00 a.m. (Room 216)

Atheist Meet-and-Greet
Ed You

This atheist, agnostic, humanist, etc. meet-and-greet can be “hosted” by anyone that is motivated to lead the discussions, with Ed You as the default host. This forum is for you, whether you want to discuss atheist reading lists, other atheist groups, the politics of atheism, how religious oppression impedes you from coming out of the atheist closest, or if you simply want to meet others that share atheist/agnostic values.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Addressing Urban Inequality and Poverty
James Carras

Income inequality, racial isolation and poverty in the greater Miami region continue to be fundamental issues that must be addressed for the region’s economic future. Place and race have long been defining characteristics of the opportunity structure of the area. While the robust growth of Miami’s downtown and the continued success of tourism along the coastal communities are market perception, much of the economic reality is one of restrained and limited opportunities for minorities and the poor. Mr. Carras, who conducts research and lectures on urban policy issues, will detail the level of economic and racial isolation with a focus on policy options to address disparities in opportunity.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

AMC Meeting

See your American Mensa Committee in action! Be the first to know about policies that affect all American Mensans. All members are welcome to attend and observe.
9:00 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Are We Defined by Our Demographics?"

Political strategist Karl Rove was bewildered when Barack Obama's win contradicted Rove's polling data. The punditocracy correctly predicted that mostly-black precincts in the South voted for Hillary Clinton but they were surprised when mostly-black precincts in Michigan voted heavily for Bernie Sanders. What does demographic analysis get right, and why does it go wrong? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
9:00 a.m. (Great Hall 6)

2017 Hollywood AG Scrabble Tournament
Judy Ford

It's never too early to start studying for the 2017 Hollywood AG Scrabble Tournament, open to all AG attendees ages 16 and older. Be sure to sign up as soon as you arrive! The word reference will be the latest NASPA Official Tournament and Club Word List.  Get a head start by downloading "The Cheat Sheet" to learn unusual Scrabble words, available free at cross-tables.com/cs .
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

History Lessons for the Architects of the New U.S.-Cuba Policy
José Azel

Architects of the new U.S. - Cuba policy rationalize that unconditionally ending economic sanctions will strengthen Cuba’s self-employed sector and, thus, foster a civil society more independent of the government. Eventually, they explain, this more autonomous civil society will function as agents of change pressuring the regime for democratic governance. This is an ethnocentric proposition anchored on economic determinism that overweighs economic variables and fails to understand the nature of the Cuban regime.
9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Archaeology of Florida
Sara Ayers-Rigsby

Join the Florida Public Archaeology Network on a whirlwind tour of 12,000 years in Florida, from the earliest residents through the Cold War. In this presentation, we will learn about Florida’s fascinating archaeology and investigate archaeological sites, from Tequesta sites in Miami to Spanish exploration in Pensacola. Florida has been a fabulous place to live for 12,000 years — come and find out why! (For more information, see: fpan.us )
10:00 a.m. (West hallway outside Great Hall 1 & 2)

Blood Drive

Come save up to three lives by donating blood! Research suggests that blood donation may improve insulin sensitivity, relieve iron overload and hasten inebriation. However, the best reason to give blood is that your donation of one pint can save the lives of up to three people. Please take a few minutes to donate! You’ll be glad you did. FAQs including eligibility are at oneblood.org. To give whole blood, just walk in. To give double red cells or platelets, if possible make an appointment at tinyurl.com/AG2017blood. If questions, please call or text Griffin Smith at (770) 853-6478.
10:30 a.m. (Room 212 & 213)

HackerNest-M: Meet-and-Greet and Tech Showcase
Annika Thurlow

Get your nerd on and geek out with HackerNest-M! Bring your arduino kits, Raspberry PIs, RFID toys, sensors, robots, laptops and anything else you want. Show us what you've made or build something cool. Everyone is welcome to join in, talk tech and meet the HackerNest-M Tech Community. Kids welcome!?
10:30 a.m. (Room 216)

Redhead Mensans: 2% of the 2%
Rob Salkin

Come meet fellow redheaded and ginger-loving geniuses! This event is for those who have, had or appreciate orange, auburn, strawberry blond or any other fiery shade of hair. Expect a mostly unstructured Meet-and-Greet after a brief introduction, including information on Ginger City, USA, and the League of Extraordinary Red Heads [sic].
10:30 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Clergy SIG Meet-and-Greet
Tony Belarmino

Have you been communicating with SIG members for a long time and want to finally meet them? Now is the chance to do just that. Have you ever wondered if the Clergy SIG is right for you? Now is the chance to meet other members and see if you would like it. You might be surprised to find out we are regular people who enjoy life.
10:30 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Political Stereotypes — Myth or Reality?"

Traditionally every Republican position on an issue could be predicted by the answer to the question, "Will this alleviate or exacerbate the servant problem?" Traditionally every Democrat position on an issue could be predicted by the answer to the question, "Will this increase or decrease people's dependence on the Federal Government?" Which, if either, of these characterizations is valid? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Metaphors Be with You
Richard Lederer

You may have been taught that a simile is "a is like b" and a metaphor is "a is b." Au contraire. Mensa Bulletin senior columnist Richard Lederer will demonstrate how metaphors really work, exhibiting the likes of body metaphors and animal metaphors. He'll also welcome your questions about puns to punctuation, pronouns to pronunciation, and palaver to palindromes.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Law Not War
Ben Ferencz

My address will deal with the recognition that the illegal use of armed force in violation of the UN Charter should be deterred by being punishable as a crime against humanity for which the leaders responsible will be held to account criminally and civilly in any competent court of law. From the AG Program Chair: We are proud to host Ben Ferencz, an honored Harvard Law graduate, who served three years as a combat soldier in World War II. Toward war's end, he became a war crimes investigator collecting evidence of Nazi atrocities. He became Chief Prosecutor in one of the subsequent Nuremberg trials where 22 high-ranking defendants were convicted of murdering more than one million men, women, and children. He was then 27 years old. Now, at 98, he has spent practically his whole life trying to deter illegal war-making. His work to prevent crimes against humanity has been recognized throughout the world. (See: benferencz.org)
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Travel to Cuba with American Mensa and Road Scholar
Claire McGurn

Road Scholar is proud to be the largest not-for-profit provider of learning adventures in Cuba. Since we were awarded a People-to-People license in 2010, more than 7,000 adults have experienced Cuba with us. Come learn about the private group charter trip American Mensa has arranged exclusively for its members. We will share details of the Cuba adventure including trip highlights and enrollment options. Learn how you can delve into the rich history and heritage of Cuba on a private group experience with Road Scholar and American Mensa.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

IQ Testing: Men, Women and Means
Chloe Roberts

This presentation delves in-depth into recent scientific research on measuring intelligence and how to ensure that methods for capturing intelligence are up to date and accurate. It will conclude with wide-ranging recommendations for future intelligence testing that is gender neutral.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

The Security Profession in the 21st Century
Thomas J. Langer

The world of cyber has rapidly expanded the amount and portability of data in the hands of people. The crown jewels of governments, industries, organizations and citizens have never been more vulnerable than they are today. Elections are decided, power centers altered and all the time human and personal contact becomes more and more remote, distant and electronic. Yet all the while the ‘traditional’ security industry has its routes solidly in the physical world and its eyes on the digital and virtual. Crime and terror know no ground rules for theft, exploitation or ransom so how does this profession adapt, adjust, and remain relevant to the communities we serve?
11:00 a.m. (Great Hall 5)

Learning Session — Pente
Alice Silver

A two-person game of skill, simple to learn and play but difficult to master. Played on a grid with colored stones, players compete to achieve a straight line of five stones or flank and capture five pairs of their opponent’s stones. Join us in the Games Room if you would like to learn the game or need a refresher before the tournament on Saturday at 4:30 p.m.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Learn to Overcome Your Daily Challenges Using Ancient "Yoga Secrets"
Ken Heptig

Ken Heptig will lead you through secrets that can calm your pain, stress and anxiety and help you find more energy, happiness and meaning in your life. He refined the secrets while teaching thousands of yoga classes. He improved the lessons for simplicity and clarity until his students could absorb the lessons while practicing different levels of yoga. Ken will explain the agonizing process he went through while writing Yoga Secrets: 52 Life-Changing Secrets. His book is suitable for anyone with or without a physical practice of yoga. You can use the lessons on your own, add them to group activities, classrooms and yoga classes. The 52 secrets follow the ancient wisdom of the Yoga Sutra's Eight Limbs of Yoga.
12:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Intertel Meet-and-Greet
Linda Woodhead

Intertel is a high-IQ society for those who have scored at or above the 99th percentile on a standardized IQ test. Intertel nurtures a sense of camaraderie between members and provides opportunities for them to communicate and express their unique views. Founded in 1966, Intertel currently has about 1,400 members worldwide. Current members are invited to meet their fellow members. Potential members are invited to meet current members and learn about joining.
12:00 p.m. (Great Hall 5)

Learning Session — Euchre
Tammy Hicks

Euchre (“YOU-ker”) is a trick-taking card game usually played in two-player teams using traditional playing cards. Join us in the Games Room if you would like to learn the game or need a refresher before the tournament on Friday at 4:30 p.m.
12:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Assisted Suicide"

Was Dr. Jack Kevorkian a monster or ahead of his time? At what point in the cycle of life does an individual have the unalienable right to choose end his or her own life? Is the desire to die more than just a desire to escape pain? Do Washington, Oregon, the Netherlands and Switzerland have the right approach, with doctor approvals and waiting periods? How would you want to go?  Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

The Holocaust Survivor Who Took on Scientology
Paulette Cooper Noble

Author Paulette Cooper Noble lost her parents in Auschwitz and was almost killed there herself. When she came to America and grew up, she took on another fascistic group, Scientology. She wrote the first major expose of them, a book titled The Scandal of Scientology. Then they really came after her. Listen to her harrowing and fascinating story of her 15-year struggle with the Scientologists. It's a battle that cost Paulette years of continuous harassment, included 19 lawsuits against her, being framed on federal bomb threat charges leading to her arrest and almost her life!
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Hurricanes and Global Warming: Expectations Versus Observations
Christopher W. Landsea

Climate variability and any resulting change in the characteristics of tropical cyclones (tropical storms, subtropical storms and hurricanes) have become topics of great interest and research recently. Some scientific articles have reported a large increase in tropical cyclone energy, numbers and windspeeds in the last few decades in association with warmer sea surface temperatures. These increases have been linked to man-made greenhouse gas changes. I do not dispute that anthropogenic forcing caused at least a substantial portion of observed 20th century warming. It is likely that some increase in tropical cyclone peak windspeeds have occurred and will occur if the climate continues to warm. However, whether greenhouse gas warming is related to increased tropical cyclone activity is not the most relevant question. More important, what is the sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity and activity to greenhouse gas forcing? These questions and others will be addressed in the talk.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Navigating Public Health in a Sea of Biomedical Pseudoscience: A Perspective from the Lab Bench
Christopher Himes

When is comes to public health there is no shortage of pervasive misconceptions. It's quite easy to be swept away by marketing propaganda and health buzzwords, consequently losing sight of the scientific fundamentals behind them. The goal of this talk is to clarify what peer-reviewed science has to say about poorly understood health topics (GMOs, flu vaccines, homeopathic remedies, detoxes, vitamin supplementation and more), expose the sources of error from which these derive, and teach the layman how to identify reputable sources and conflicts of interest before jumping on the latest health craze bandwagon.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

God is on Our Side: Religion and Civil Rights
Neil Caesar

Former resident of the ACLU of South Carolina, Neil has stood in the forefront of such civil rights issues involving religion as: teaching Intelligent Design, opening government meetings with “Jesus prayer,” manger scenes and Ten Commandments displays, police harassment of Druids and those darn Muslim immigrants. We will explore how religion impacts civil rights; how politics impacts meaningful change; whether these issues are particularly prominent in the South; and what such issues may suggest philosophically or sociologically. So leave your rotten tomatoes at the door, and let’s discuss the [pick one: saintly/devil-spawn]civil rights fighters and their fight [pick one: for/against] religious freedom.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Word Power: English from Its Latin and Greek roots
Jim Ancmon

English words are not something to be studied in isolation, but they are related in certain ways to the other languages of the world. We will examine the influence Latin and Greek exerted upon the development of English. Our task will be accomplished by a combination of: 1) Study of Latin and Greek word elements 2) Exposure to lists of unfamiliar word 3) Practice recognizing word's meanings in context and 4) Listing new words encountered in reading. Hopefully the attendee will become interested in words as symbols which express a connection with a lively past and eventually benefit from a broadened vocabulary.
1:30 p.m. (Room 216)

Single Mensans Unite!
Rob Salkin

If you're smart and single, this event is for you! There are about 2,000 geniuses here this holiday weekend. Find the right one for you! This will be a semi-structured Meet-and-Greet after a brief introduction, including information about the M-Available SIG (facebook.com/groups/MAvailableSIG) and other ways to meet single Mensans.
1:30 p.m. (Room 217)

SIGs Officer Meet-and-Greet
Nancy Farrar

Meet-and-Greet for coordinators of Special Interest Groups. Meet the new SIGs Officer and also share tips and tricks for running SIGs and attracting members.
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Living Like a Spiritual Warrior
Chuck Hillig

Can you still be truly authentic within yourself while you're living in an inauthentic world? Do you have the courage to now begin experiencing your life with full awareness, integrity and heart? Are you finally ready to wake up to who you really are and to begin living an enlightened life down in the marketplace? If you're ready to radically shift your everyday awareness, then come and learn these practical steps for awakening your inner warrior.
1:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Separation of State and Church"

Does the First Amendment exempt all churches from every Federal law? How about mosques and synagogues and covens? Should the U.S. military maintain the chaplain's corps?  Should taxpayers pay for rebuilding churches after a weather catastrophe? Is opening government meetings with a prayer O.K.? (SCOTUS says yes.) Should blasphemy be illegal? (Europe may say yes.) How should conflicts between religions be adjudicated, or is that possible under U.S. civil law? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
1:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

3rd Semi-Annual Stratton Lindenmeyer Memorial Spelling Bee
Jonathan Elliott

Stratton was one of the Los Angeles chapter’s most colorful characters (as well as one of its smartest) for some 50 years until his passing in early 2016. Among his many special quirks, he would administer spelling bees in which he would sometimes accidentally mispronounce the word to be spelled, which of course made things more challenging for us. This year’s spelling bee will pay homage to this tradition, so make sure not to rely completely on the presenter’s pronunciation, because it is not always going to be completely correct!
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Flying the Son Tay P.O.W. Rescue Raid in North Vietnam
Major William "Bill" Guenon, USAF (Ret)

Vietnam, Nov. 21, 1970. This is a first-hand account of the raid on Son Tay, North Vietnam. This operation, conducted jointly by Air Force, Navy and Army Special Operations Forces, was mounted to rescue 63 U.S. prisoners of war, being held being held in the shadows of Hanoi. Major William "Bill" Guenon, USAF (Ret.), the operation’s lead C-130E pilot, will provide an eyewitness, A-to-Z rundown of the Son Tay raid from takeoff through return landing. His commentary will cover the raid’s planning, execution, surprise glitches they had to overcome along the way and why it eventually led to a major reorganization of the U.S. intelligence community. For more information please see: SecretandDangerous.com
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Large-scale Neural Networks of the Brain at "Rest"
Jason Scott Nomi

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) originally focused on mapping brain activation in response to an external task (i.e., task-based fMRI) such as language processing or face perception. Traditionally, it was thought that brain activation unrelated to a specific external task would be unstructured and random, and therefore not informative of brain function. However, research now demonstrates that spontaneous brain activity acquired with fMRI when participants simply lie in the scanner and “rest” is structured and can provide meaningful information about brain function. This talk will describe methods used to identify large-scale neural networks in the brain at “rest” and how differences in such resting-state brain networks may help to characterize clinical disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Skyscrapers and Solution Holes: Circum-Caribbean Migration and Urban Archaeology in Downtown Miami
Mallory Fenn

The more things change, the more they stay the same. In the context of human occupation in south Florida, this old adage has proven to ring true time and time again. Though sometimes written off as nothing more than a tourist trap, South Florida is home to thousands of years of human history — and many settlement patterns in this region have remained surprisingly consistent throughout time. Follow the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) through South Florida's prehistory. For more information see: flpublicarchaeology.org/serc/index.php
3:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

GenM Boom Plus Meet-and-Greet
Barb Holstein

All baby boomers and older invited. Come find out what all the fun is about in this rapidly growing group!
3:00 p.m. (Room 217)

Alzheimer's and Dementia Support Group
Elna Tymes

Join us for a supportive gathering of patients and caregivers involved with Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias.
3:00 p.m. (Great Hall 5)

Chess King of the Hill Competition
Abel Dean

We will play a fun high-speed chess variant: whoever first moves the king into the center four squares, or doesn't run out of time, is the winner of the round. The game is also in the style of King of the Hill: each competitor starts with only three tokens, challenging the king costs a token, the king may choose a challenger if all subjects are cowardly, a winning challenger becomes the new king, and staying king requires winning against all challengers. Only one minute is on the chess clock for each round, and the final king keeps the clock as a prize. It's 2017, so of course "king" is gender-neutral.
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Betrayal of Valor: An Expose of Horrors at the Veterans Administration by a High Profile Advocate
Eric Gang

You’ve seen the recent Veterans Administration scandals where service-injured veterans are literally dying while awaiting medical and other benefits as bureaucrats delay-till-they-die to keep reporting numbers up! An ongoing scandal with egregious case studies by the score. Eric Gang’s new book Betrayal of Valor, due out mid-July, exposes the VA’s massive failures that set tens of thousands of vets on a downward cycle of drugs, family breakups, unemployment and homelessness. He’s a veteran’s advocate and is deeply involved on the good side of the VA scandals on behalf of service men and women disabled during their service. You likely saw in Time Magazine that he just got medical benefits approved (retroactively) for a 90 year old (a 20+ year fight!) who, as a young soldier, guarded a U.S. toxic weapons dump with no warnings or safeguards. President Trump and Congress promise reform. Will it happen? Get a state-of-the-VA report and forecast from American veterans’ most visible advocate.
3:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Government Agency Survival"

Everyone has a least-favorite government department, agency or program. What's yours? Suppose you could vote it off the island. After you close that agency, how would you handle whatever mission it had been created for, or can we do without it entirely? On the flip-side, why would you keep the government institutions that others in the room want to close? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
3:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Farkle Tournament
June Brasgalla

Join us for a fun game of Farkle — no experience needed. No skill is required; just luck at throwing dice.  It moves fast and is lots of  fun for the whole family. Scoring sheets will be provided. Farkle is purely a game of chance but prizes will be given to the winners. Join us and meet new people! Games will be limited to 10 people each.  Young people are welcome; children under 10 must be accompanied by an adult.  Sign up in the Tournament Room, as we’re limited to 30 people. Please, no food or drink at the table.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

The History of Coral Research in the Galapagos Islands
Joshua Feingold, Ph.D.

This talk summarizes the scientific knowledge of scleractinian corals in the Galápagos Archipelago. A general introduction to coral biology and ecology is followed by a brief history of coral research in the islands, responses of corals to broad-scale impacts, anthropogenic stress on Galápagos corals and recommendations for management of this important resource. The scientific aspects of this talk will be supplemented by a presentation of photographs and videos chronicling corals and related organisms in this beautiful natural living laboratory.
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Television: Then and Now
Paul Noble

A capsule history of the development of what was America’s favorite mass medium for 70 years and how it changed. From an entertainment novelty to binge-ing, from “live” to recorded, from “real” to “reality,” from small screen to big screen to small screen again — we look at the landmarks, high and low points and the impact of TV.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

The Electric Grid: Past, Present and Future
Jameson Thornton

The electric grid was called the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century. It has also been called the most complex machine ever built. This presentation will discuss how the electric grid came to be, how it works today, and how it may work in the future. This topic is presented by an industry insider with a special focus on the California grid. Keeping the lights on is more involved than you may think.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Miccosukee Indians' Traditional Ecological Knowledge Inspires Everglades Conservation
Rev. Houston R. Cypress, Otter Clan

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) informs the Everglades conservation projects of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians, of Florida. Storytelling, scientific analysis and the expression of sovereignty are vital components of this indigenous community’s strategy for upholding the integrity of the circle of life. Through the examination of policy statements, short films, poetry and other works of art, the speaker will offer insight on the culture of the Miccosukee Tribe and how their way of life is connected with the vitality of the Greater Everglades ecosystem. Speaker will highlight various challenges inhibiting Everglades Restoration, and suggest solutions and items for action using an approach that will be holistic and eclectic.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

The Paper Chase: A Comical Story Of One Man’s Race to Beat the Clock
Matthew Grob

In January 2009, on a weekend that saw windchills fall below zero, 800 Jewish people were attending a conference at a resort in the Catskills when the heat went out. Among the many challenges that arose was the need to procure disposable plates, bowls, cups and cutlery to feed those 800 cold people for three meals – all within the two hours left before sunset. What followed was a frenzied race around upstate New York that proved to make for a great story filled with twists and turns, suspense and a whole lot of laughs. This story has been told in print, to audiences in person and now, attendees at the AG can not only hear it firsthand from a pretty darn good storyteller but also learn a little about the Jewish laws governing the Sabbath and keeping kosher. An equally entertaining slide show accompanies the story.
4:30 p.m. (Room 216)

Gifted Youth Coordinators Meet-and-Greet
Jamie Uphold

If you are a Gifted Youth Coordinator, a LocSec or anyone else who works with youth in a Local Group (or who would like to), join us and get new ideas, ask questions, and share insights. Find out what resources are available to you and get the full scoop on serving youth in a Local Group. Note: No childcare will be provided for this event.
4:30 p.m. (Room 217)

Proctor and Testing Coordinator Meet & Greet
Jennifer Jewell

Open to all Proctors, Proctors-in-training and Testing Coordinators. This session is to discuss some of the ins and outs of the testing program and will allow lots of time for Q&A.
4:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Devaluing the Fetus or Revaluing the Woman?"

It's one of the oldest moral issues humanity has faced — whose life is more precious, a mother's or the child she's carrying? Societal consensus has fluctuated from one side to the other across geographies and over the centuries. In Western societies the majority view appears to have shifted in the past 50 years. Why is that, and is the shift morally defensible? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
4:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Puzzle Speed Tournament
Debbie Freeland

Some of us like to do jigsaw puzzles to relax; some of us like to bring the adrenaline rush of competition into everything we do. Join with your friends (or attendees you’ve just met!) and compete to see which team can assemble a 300-piece jigsaw puzzle the quickest.  Up to eight teams can compete. After the puzzle is unveiled, teams will have three minutes to strategize before the speed-puzzling begins. The winning team is, of course, the first to shout out that they’re done — and then present a completed puzzle.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Looks And Sounds Like a Winner: How Perceptions of Competence in Candidates’ Faces and Voices Influence How We Govern Ourselves
Dr. Casey Klofstad, PhD

Why are some societies paralyzed by violence while others are peaceful? Why is the gap between the rich and the poor astronomical in some societies, but less so in others? The answers to these fundamental questions are tied directly to how we choose our leaders. The standard approach to studying this important topic has been to examine the demographic characteristics of the voter. For example, Democrats tend to vote for Democrats, and Republicans for Republicans. While this line of inquiry has greatly informed our understanding of how we govern ourselves it negates the role of biology in human decision-making. More specifically, while modern-day politics might seem to be in the domain of high-level cognitive decisions, it is important to realize that our behaviors are also influenced by our biology. In this seminar we will address how two biological signals — vocal and visual — influence voters.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Hard Times to Hard Rocks
Patsy West

This fully illustrated history of the Florida Seminole and Miccosukee Tribes of southern Florida discusses these native peoples from the time of DeSoto’s chronicler in 1540. Against a backdrop of tribal traditions and the evolution of customs, this presentation focuses on the Seminole Wars of the 19th century, fought against their forced removal from Florida by the United States; the survivors’ post war era of fur trade in the latter 19th and early 20th centuries; the Mikasuki-speaking majority’s adaptation of a lucrative commercial touristic employment in Miami in the early 20th century; the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s windfall of a gaming economy beginning in 1979; and their purchase of the Hard Rock International brand in the early 21st century.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Have There Always Been Addicts?
J. Bryan Page

Although humankind has had access to intoxicating preparations for at least 15,000 years, if not longer, evidence of addiction does not appear in human literature until about 1550. Before that approximate time, none of the ancient writings attributed chronicity to people who occasionally got drunk. Repeatedly, the ancients warned against drunkenness as a troublesome excess, but they did not call anyone a drunkard. That would have implied habitual drunkenness, where people repeatedly got into trouble because of frequent intoxication. The ancient authors’ observations of drunkenness provided cautionary tales about its dangers, but they did not warn against forming a habit. Expressions of alarm over the behavior of drunken men in public began to increase in frequency during the late-17th and early-18th centuries, and these expressions coincided with the wildfire spread of rum, gin, brandy and whiskeys throughout the British Isles and elsewhere.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Bill Shipper Concert
Bill Stanek

Musical comedian Bill Shipper returns to the AG bringing songs imbued with words for nerds guaranteed to tickle your punny bone. Bill brings new and favorite quirky tunes such as “It Is not I, Babe,” “My Lover Loves Liver," “Tears on My Spreadsheet" and "Dirty Data." From poking fun at foodies to satire on business and technology, Bill Shipper never fails to deliver a hilarious, delightful concert.
5:00 p.m. (Great Hall 5)

Learning Session — Dominion
Robert Goldsmith

This very popular deck-building game is easy to learn. Join us in the Games Room if you would like to learn the game or need a refresher before the tournament on Thursday at 6:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

BRAND YOU! To Land Your Dream Job: Secrets to Finding and Landing a Great Job — A Mensan-authored Book
Diane Huth

Finding and landing your ideal job doesn’t happen by chance. You have to know the secrets of how to market yourself just like a brand to stand head and shoulder above all other applicants. In today’s digital world, that means learning to master the online application process and computerized resume review and matching system that rejects more than half of all applications before a human being actually sets eyes on your credentials. Then you need to know the soft skills of networking, finding hidden jobs and negotiating your compensation package to ensure you land the right job and get paid for your talents. You will learn this unique set of skills to ensure you find a great job, get hired and jumpstart your career – fast! You’ll also gain an insider’s view of what it takes to be the one person out of hundreds of applicants to receive the coveted offer. Don’t apply for another job before your master and apply these priceless insights to ensure your job hunting success.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Should I Graduate from High School Early? Pros and Cons of Radical Acceleration
Lessa Scherrer

Grade-skipping is becoming more common for gifted kids, and gifted teens are often eager to leave high school far behind. But did you know that you have to be at least 16 to live in a college dorm? And why early graduates are often not competitive at Ivy League schools? Come learn the benefits and pitfalls of graduating at a young age or in less than four years. Using case studies of actual 14- and 15-year-old graduates, we'll discuss how residential early college programs, early college high schools, deferred entrance programs and gap years can ease the transition to higher education and why even the brightest 12-year-old can't get into Stanford.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

You're the Right Caller! How to Win Radio Contests Like a Pro
Gregg Pompei

Broadcasting companies make money based on how many people listen to their stations. To get you to tune in, they bribe you with the chance to win stuff. Pompei will share secrets of how to maximize your chances of it being you to win these prizes. Pompei has been participating in radio contests for over 20 years, and has won money, countless concert tickets and even a trip. He will discuss the different common types of contests, deciding which contests to pursue, preparation and setup prior to the contest, dialing techniques (including use of multiple phones), effective use of telephone and electronic services and resources and things that can go wrong and how to prevent them. He will discuss typical rules and what is allowed and what isn't; what to keep track of and how; what happens once you do win; tax considerations; and what to do if an issue arises.
6:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Region 6 Meet-and-Greet
Taz Criss

Join RVC 6 Taz Criss and other Region 6 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and your region in particular.
6:00 p.m. (Room 217)

Region 2 Meet-and-Greet
Billie Lee

Join the newly elected RVC 2 and other Region 2 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 2 in particular.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Intelligent Design and Natural Law
Larry Paarmann

It is the contention of this presentation that Intelligent Design theory adheres to natural law, and therefore is scientific according to the historical definition of the term, whereas Darwinian Evolution, as applied by most beginning with Darwin himself, is not scientific. Darwinian Evolution is inherently philosophical, even religious, due to its commitment to an unsubstantiated belief that all things are possible through natural means. No matter what biology encounters, it developed by natural means to achieve what it is today. The lack of a generally accepted theory of evolution contradicts this, as does the lack of evidence in the fossil record, as does biological structures that are irreducibly complex, as does the complex information content of DNA, and as does common sense. Intelligent Design theory accepts and applies known natural laws, which Darwinism does not, and therefore Intelligent Design should be recognized as science, whereas Darwinism should not.
6:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Controlling Costs in U.S. Health Care"

Both ObamaCare and TrumpCare are about paying for health care, not much about controlling costs. Whether supported by taxes or insurance premiums, costs are on a steady rise. How can that trend be stopped or reversed? Would a national drug plan à la Canada rein in drug costs? Can we switch from fee-for-service to something else, and if so, what? Can hospitals survive without charging $25 for aspirin tablets? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
6:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Dominion Tournament
Robert Goldsmith

This is the original and popular deck-building game. The tournament will be played in two rounds. Round 1 will only use kingdom cards from the base set. Winners will go on to Round 2. Round 2 will use kingdom cards from any and all expansions. Sign up early! Learn it in the Games Room on Thursday at 5 p.m.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Companies that Kill: Auto, Pharma — Execs Weigh Cost to Fix a Defect Versus Cost to Pay Injured or Dead
John Uustal, Bob Kelley

John Uustal and Bob Kelley expose companies whose products kill or seriously injure people — often knowingly, balancing the cost to repair a known danger or defect against the cost to pay off the families of victims. Their stories come straight from the headlines, where they were often the lawyers for victims. GM decided to save $2.20 per car by skipping fire protection between the gas tank and the passenger compartment — one of the largest companies-that-kill verdicts in history. Bob was the victims' lawyer. Nissan rollovers, defective seatbelts and other products where cost to repair a known defect was more than the cost of lives lost, so companies just went forward — Jon was the lawyer for victims. This value of human life versus corporate greed calculation still happens every day in health care, pharmaceuticals, autos, consumer products. Learn what you can do, how to stay safe and the next big corporate threats from two pros who live on the front lines of the worst of corporate conduct.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Eugenics: Improving the Human Race, or Scientific Validation for Racism? (Adults Only)
Kelly Shibari, Erin Basler

In medically beneficial, societally harmful and ethically specious ways, eugenics-based practices are still being used in the U.S. This workshop aims to educate on eugenics history, contemporary practices and how the history of eugenics is intertwined with contemporary sexual health and rights. This workshop starts conversation about eugenics-based practices so we can remove the stigma from the word while honoring its complex reach in reproductive and sexual justice and recognize harmful eugenics-based practices in action. This workshop contains discussion of coercive reproductive practices; racial, gender and ability-based discrimination; white supremacy; and cis/heterosexism. The way we talk about sexual and reproductive rights can be potentially traumatic if we, as educators, are not informed about the historical context of eugenics-based practices.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

A History of Genius: Discussion of a Book on That Topic
Dan Punzak

Darrin McMahon, a historian then at Florida State University and now at Dartmouth, authored a 2013 book titled Divine Fury: A History of Genius. Dan will discuss the evolutionary changes in the concept of genius that have occurred over the last 2,500 years as presented by McMahon with Dan's own interpretation.
7:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Drug Legalization"

How much of our legal woes are tied to drug trafficking? How do you think drug legalization would affect the future? Which institutions would win, which lose? Would the legalization experience of Portugal hold true for the U.S.? Do some drugs, such as methamphetamine, always need to be illegal? Is legalization of pot inevitable? How soon? Can it still be withheld from under-25-year-olds, whose brains it will damage? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
7:30 p.m. (Room 214)

Broward Mensa ExComm Meeting

The Executive Committee meeting for Broward Mensa, the group for the Fort Lauderdale area. All members of Broward Mensa are welcome to attend (no AG registration required).
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing but the Truth: A Primer on the Manipulation of Statistics
Marc Gold

Those who take part in this presentation will leave with a better understanding as to how objectively to evaluate studies, polls and various numerical arguments. Put another way, through the use of mainly factual examples, including many recent ones, the attendees will learn to approach statistical pronouncements in a more objective and insightful manner. Examples will range from the obviously defective poll to the situation where a true statistical statement is used to draw a false conclusion.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Painting Across Generations: The Legacy of the Florida Highwaymen
Elissa Rudolph

To know and enjoy Florida history, one must review this unique phenomenon: a group of African American artists whose mid-20th century paintings revolutionized their lives and turned the art world on its head. Working in broad strokes, these untrained but savvy artists took typical Florida images – colorful sunsets, egrets, the ocean, palm trees, the Everglades — and captured the beauty and fragility of the state on Upson board instead of canvas. The quickly realized (still wet sometimes!) paintings were then inexpensively sold to those traveling Highway 1 — the tourists had a piece of Florida to display in their northern homes and the Highwaymen made their livings through art and commerce instead of working the orange groves and factories.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Any President but Donald Trump
Ian Randal Strock

When writing The Presidential Book of Lists, Ian Randal Strock calculated the “average president” and the extremes. But the election of Donald Trump apparently broke the mold. Or did it? While it’s true that President Trump is very far from the average set out by his 43 predecessors, in many respects he may not be as unique as you might think. This look at how Trump compares to the other 43 men we’ve called president will be non-partisan, but that doesn’t mean you won’t see the presidents in a new light or have some of your preconceived notions confirmed.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

A Desert of Wonderful and Strange Places
John Wieczorek

In Toronto Mensa, there is a monthly presentation called Inquiring Minds. About once a year, John Wieczorek is called in to present pictures and stories from his travels. An intermission of light, enjoyable material among the otherwise heady topics. Attendance seems good and audiences are usually quite engaged in the images and stories. For this AG, John will focus on the strange and wonderful places in the deserts of the Southwest. Friendly, fun deserts as experienced from an Active M perspective. The only way you would ever seen these places from a tour bus would be if it were transported there tethered to a helicopter. You may have already noticed some of these pictures in common areas.  In this presentation is the opportunity to hear the story behind those photos. (Sometimes at AG/RGs I set up a table to show and sell some of my pictures. I make a few bucks, but mostly it's for fun.) My photo website is risingedgegallery.com
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Star in Your Universe — Shining Light on Unique Contributors for Professional and Personal Growth
Julie Beltz

Star in Your Universe – Shining Light on Unique Contributors for Professional and Personal Growth examines how unique individuals with high capability can both identify and frame their talents and standout qualities to enable success in career and life. Learn how to pinpoint exactly what sets you apart from the competition, and then how to leverage those skills and attributes. Discuss how to brand yourself, including how to turn negative stereotypes from potential weaknesses into untapped strengths. Discover how to maximize your inner circle – among whom you're already known – to build stronger circles of recognition and broaden your reach. Learn about the pieces of strategic communication that can elevate you among peers and supervisors in professional settings, and friends and acquaintances in social settings. Everyone wants to shine, but make your shining star the one to which everyone wants to be hitched.
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Carmina Burana Sing-Along
Dave Cahn

An annual favorite! Sing along with (or just listen to) a recording of the bawdy, lustful songs of Carl Orff’s "Carmina Burana." You don’t need a good voice to enjoy this. Lyrics (in Medieval Latin, Middle High German and a few verses of Old Provençal) will be provided, or you can view or download the handout. If you have a copy of the score, please feel free to bring it.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3 Cassandra)

Reclaiming Sexuality and Narrative After Sexual Trauma
Cassandra Corrado, Kelly Shibari

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, one in five women and one in 71 men will be sexually assaulted at some point in their lives — and 80 percent of those assaults will be committed by someone whom the survivor knows. At its root, sexual violence is committed as a way of exerting power and control over someone — so what does it mean when that violence is committed by someone whom you know and trust? In this workshop, we will discuss the emotional landscapes after sexual violence, ways that sexual violence impacts desire, fantasy, and sexuality, and how survivors can reclaim their sexualities and personal narratives after trauma. This workshop is grounded in an empowerment model and will include information and tools relevant for both survivors and their loved ones. Note: This workshop and its description discuss sexual violence and its impact on sexuality, and is intended for mature or adult audiences.
9:00 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Name That Movie Tournament
John Neemidge, Geri Neemidge

Name That Movie consists of short clips from about 40 movies. Each movie clip represents one or more themes. We ask that you identify each movie and the themes. Play as individuals or as a team of up to five people. We try to make each clip interesting on its own, so even if you don't know movies very well, we hope the game will be entertaining. Clips (not the movies themselves) are chosen to be PG or G rated. We'll provide a key with information about each movie and themes at the end.
9:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Gun Control or Gun Rights?"

Would restricting guns reduce gun violence, as it did in Australia? Or are restrictions in America impossible, as Sam Harris maintains? Should every U.S. citizen have an unrestricted right to bear any weapon under all circumstances? If not, who gets to decide what the limitations will be? Does the N.R.A. speak more for gun enthusiasts or gun manufacturers? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
9:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Lords of Waterdeep Tournament
Kevin Brawner

Lords of Waterdeep is a heavy strategy agent-assignment game where players collect resources and complete quests. We will play eight rounds; the person with the most points will be the winner.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

I.Q. — Intimacy Quotient
Jai Simone

What does sexy mean to you? Poet and sexual empowerment coach Jai Simone will share some knowledge that will make you more irresistible. In this presentation we will discuss what is “normal” in sexual response and activity, adult toys and cinema, fetishes, erotic poetry, and other interesting taboo topics. Let me show you some steps to find your authentic sexual self and create a more satisfying romantic and erotic life.
10:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Charades
Dave Cahn

Our non-competitive format is fun for newcomers and experienced players alike. Act out titles, quotations, gag sayings, punchlines, etc. Discover your inner mime. Guess what others are trying to convey. Instructions provided before we start.
10:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Marriage"

Should government restrict marriage to "one-man, one-woman?" Should government force everyone to honor other partnerships as marriages? Gay marriage gets the headlines, but with over 20% of all American adults now single, is there a larger issue here than the headlines (and politicians) want to admit? Should government just butt out and administer contract law in a way that doesn't tell us what is or is not a "marriage?" Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!

Friday, July 7

8:00 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Yoga "all levels" Vinyasa class with a spiritual intention. Bring a mat/towel. Fitness attire.
Ken Heptig

Ken Heptig, author of "Yoga Secrets", will lead you through a series of yoga poses.  He will give modifications for less or more to keep everyone challenged. Bring a mat or large towel and your sense of humor. Fitness attire recommended. This is not an introduction to yoga class. Ken believes the spiritual intentions are the most valuable part of yoga and can help you find a better life. Yoga studios throughout the United States use his book Yoga Secrets: 52 Life-Changing Secrets. Ken refined the intentions in his book while teaching thou­­sands of yoga classes. He improved the intentions for simplicity and clarity until his students could absorb the intentions while practicing different levels of yoga. The book is suitable for anyone with or without a physical practice of yoga. Use the intentions on your own or add them to a group activity like sporting events, classrooms, and yoga classes. http://goalyoga.com
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Annual Business Meeting

You’re an American Mensan and you want to know what’s happening with your organization. Come to the ABM and hear reports from the Chair, Treasurer and Executive Director, as well as the Mensa Foundation President. All members are urged to participate in the Annual Business Meeting, where they have a voice and a vote.
9:30 a.m. (Great Hall 5)

Learning Session — Concordia
Robert Goldsmith

This game involves competing to maximize the power and prestige of your house in ancient Rome. Cards are selected and played to determine the action a player takes during a given turn. The game is fairly easy to learn. Join us in the Games Room if you would like to learn the game or the Salt part of the Salsa expansion or need a refresher before the tournament on Friday at 10:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m. (Room 217)

Friends of Bill W

For Mensans and guests who are actively practicing any 12-step program. This is a non-hosted, informal program, not for observers or the curious, please.
10:30 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

M-SportsFans SIG Meet-and-Greet
Nick Elam

M-SportsFans provides a forum for discussion about all things related to major amateur/collegiate/professional sports, including statistical trends and analytics advances, innovative ways to improve the fairness and excitement of the sports we love, sophisticated (or unsophisticated) watercooler talk about recent/upcoming games and current events in sports, and offers the opportunity to participate in fantasy leagues and prediction pools. If you are interested in joining, please email the coordinator at n.elam@sportsdataresearch.com, visit us at msportsfans.org, or follow us on Twitter @MSportsFans.
10:30 a.m. (Room 216)

Atheist Meet-and-Greet
Ed You

This atheist, agnostic, humanist, etc. meet-and-greet can be “hosted” by anyone that is motivated to lead the discussions, with Ed You as the default host. This forum is for you, whether you want to discuss atheist reading lists, other atheist groups, the politics of atheism, how religious oppression impedes you from coming out of the atheist closest, or if you simply want to meet others that share atheist/agnostic values.
10:30 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Should Dead Movie Stars Stay Dead?"

Rumor has it that Carrie Fisher will have a digitally generated cameo in an upcoming Star Wars production, despite her death in 2016. Is that a good idea, or icky? How about bringing back Alan Rickman in a follow-on Hogwarts film? Should actors own a character even beyond the grave or should ownership pass to a new generation on the James-Bond-franchise model? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
10:30 a.m. (Great Hall 6)

Concordia Tournament
Robert Goldsmith

Concordia involves competing to maximize the power and prestige of your house in ancient Rome. Cards are selected and played, determining the action a player takes during a given turn. The tournament will be played in two rounds. Winners in Round 1 will go on to Round 2. Both rounds will use Salt from the Salsa Expansion (but not the Forum). Round 1 will use the Imperium board. The board for Round 2 will be selected by the games master based on the number of players. Sign up early! Learn it in the Games Room on Friday at 9:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

The Bay of Pigs: A Participant's Perspective
Eduardo Zayas-Bazán

The Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, was a failed military operation undertaken by the CIA-sponsored Brigade 2506 on April 17, 1961, at the height of the “Cold War.” Brigade 2506 was the armed wing of the exile Cuban community’s "Democratic Revolutionary Front," and the invasion was intended to overthrow the communist government of Fidel Castro. Dr. Zayas-Bazán participated in the invasion as a frogman and was one of the first six men to land at Girón beach. On the third day of the operation he was wounded in his right knee and captured. Dr. Zayas-Bazán subsequently spent a year in a Cuban prison, before being ransomed by the U.S. government, along with 59 other wounded prisoners that needed urgent medical attention. He will share his personal experience in, and perspective of, the fateful Bay of Pigs debacle.
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Soon-To-Be Ex: A Guide to Perfect Divorce and Relaunch by Celebrity Divorce Lawyer Jacqueline Newman
Jacqueline Newman

Jacqueline is the 5th Avenue Manhattan divorce lawyer you’ve seen recently in People Magazine, USA Today and the rest. As the uber-cool author of Soon-To-Be-Ex: Your Guide to the Perfect Divorce and Relaunch, she’s also cast historic gender roles aside as a 42-year-old mother of two who is the managing partner of one of three New York City’s first tier divorce law firms. Her world is Wall Street’s super high net worth divorces, celebrity matrimonial law from prenupts to split-ups and the high wire act necessary for political divorces and others where public brand value often trumps monetary assets, kids and the rest. Using high visibility and high net worth divorces from the headlines Newman extracts rules, realities, pitfalls and lessons anyone considering a divorce, in the midst of divorce or soon to complete their divorce will find valuable. Kids, money, assets and relaunching your life when it's all over: wise advice from this celebrity divorce lawyer and best-selling author.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Infant-directed Singing: What Does It Sound Like and Why Is It Important?
Shannon de l’Etoile

Infant-directed (ID) singing is the unique way mothers sing to infants as part of caregiving. Due to its ubiquitous presence and historical background, ID singing is identified as a universal caregiving behavior, and thus may impart some advantage to infants, and possibly mothers as well. Through ID singing, mothers direct infant attention and modulate infant arousal, thus providing opportunity for infant self-regulation. This presentation will present descriptive research findings regarding infant response to ID singing, in both typical and clinical populations, including mothers with post-partum depression, and infants with Down syndrome. Additional data will be provided to identify the prominent acoustic parameters of ID singing for both clinical populations. Implications will be presented for using ID singing as therapeutic intervention to promote self-regulation.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Improve Communication in Any Relationship
Paul David Wadler

Dr. Wadler is a psychologist in private practice working with couples and individuals who want to improve their relationships. Wadler was trained by Seattle psychologist Dr. John Gottman, who has spent more than 30 years studying couples. Gottman developed empirically derived principles for good, healthy communication. Wadler will demonstrate how to use these communication techniques to improve any close relationship with partners, coworkers and family members.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Multiple Intelligences. We Know You Have a High IQ: What About the Rest?
Sally Rountree Klein

As a card-carrying Mensan, Sally Klein understands better than most that the legendary intelligence quotient measures just a few types of “intelligence.”  Most serious educational researchers (and kindergarten teachers) understand that there are all brands of “smarts,” and that an individual’s intelligence is measured and manifested in unique ways. This interactive lecture helps attendees identify which of the multiple intelligences describe them and make them the gifted people they are.
12:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Region 3 Meet-and-Greet
John Voymas

Join the newly elected RVC 3 and other Region 3 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 3 in particular.
12:00 p.m. (Room 217)

Region 7 Meet-and-Greet
Richard Olcott

Join the newly elected RVC 7 and other Region 7 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 7 in particular.
12:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

HELL's M's SIG Meet-and-Greet
Beth Weiss

Wonder why all these people are wearing black shirts with an attack owl on them? Do you have one (or more) and want another? Are you interested in what's going on with the SIG? Join us for our annual Meet-and-Greet for the answer to those and other exciting questions.
12:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Sequels, Prequels — Have They Run Out of Ideas?"

What's behind the proliferation of multipart movie franchises? Gone with The Wind was popular in 1936, but there was no Returned with The Wind until Scarlett in 1991. Is it just too hard for Hollywood to develop new plots and characters, or do the production companies think it's too hard for audiences to accept them? Do you prefer new or familiar? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Fraud: A 2017 Update on the Newest Schemes and Scams That Can Cost Your Fortune or Your Life
Cookie Bakke

Fraud is the fastest growing crime in the U.S. and the world. (ID theft, credit cards, romance scams, investment fraud, telemarketing scams, Nigerian letters, death-for-dollars, health care frauds, Ponzi schemes, pharmaceutical frauds, automobile scams — the list is endless.) There are no boundaries; nobody is safe. The avenues of exposure are multiplying exponentially, and the chameleon that is fraud will chew up and swallow any victim it can find. Sadly stated, the crooks are winning. The strongest weapons available to at-risk individuals (every single one of us) are education, awareness and a general sense of how to best protect ourselves and those around us.
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

A History of the UFO Phenomenon
Robert Powell, MUFON Director of Research

Governments around the world have had to deal with the UFO phenomenon for a good part of a century. This presentation provides an overview of how the United States government has dealt with the phenomenon, beginning in World War II. The seriousness with which the military and the U.S. intelligence communities approached the UFO phenomenon internally is also discussed. At the same time, the story reveals how a subject with such apparent depth of experience and interest became treated as if it were a triviality. Some of the more interesting UFO case histories are touched upon. Also discussed is how other governments have dealt with the phenomenon. As stated in 1952 by the Air Force Chief of Intelligence, Maj. Gen. John Samford, “Credible people have seen incredible things.” For more information see explorescu.org, or contact Robert at robertmaxpowell@gmail.com.
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

OLÉ! A Demonstration of Flamenco!
Ilisa Rosal

Ilisa Rosal, founder and artistic director of Ballet Flamenco La Rosa, and company will explain and demonstrate some of the foundations of Flamenco, including the core aspects of zapateado (footwork), braseo (arms), castanuelas (castanets) and technique for hand movements, as well as basic dance steps and rhythms. She will help us to understand the elegant balance of motion and energy to express the passion that is the hallmark of Flamenco! Ballet Flamenco La Rosa is respected as one of the finest companies in Florida.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Sports Analytics 101
Nick Elam

Michael Lewis’s Moneyball, published in 2003, documents the success of the Oakland Athletics under the direction of General Manager Billy Beane. Beane eschewed popular-but-primitive approaches to scouting and in-game strategy in favor of a seemingly-radical approach, heavily reliant on advanced statistical analysis, and sparked a revolution within the world of sports. This presentation addresses the key elements of this revolution to this point, and offers a glimpse into the future of our favorite sports. Specifically, this presentation discusses how number crunchers have played an increasingly prominent role in sports in the 21st century. In addition to decisions related to player personnel decisions and on-field strategy, those in the sports world use analytics now more than ever for marketing, player safety, playing rules, etc. Still, statisticians seek to address flaws in these analytics models – flaws that have fueled sports’ ongoing old-school-vs. new-school debate.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Polyamory from A to MTINYTBYTIOK (How Giving a TED Talk Helped Me Fix Everyone Else's Relationships)
Leon Feingold

Polyamorous relationships consist of individuals of multi-partner relationships and families. Leon offers an insight through his journey in finding polyamory as the means to creating intimate, valuable relationships with multiple people. Through his journey and explanation, Leon debunks myths and presents the values of polyamory. He will be screening his TED Talk video, then lead a discussion on on polyamory and related topics. He is currently working on his first book, with the working title matching this talk's.
1:30 p.m. (Room 216)

Region 1 Meet-and-Greet
Ian Randal Strock

Join RVC 1 Ian Strock and other Region 1 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 1 in particular.
1:30 p.m. (Room 217)

Region 5 Meet-and-Greet
Baker Ring

Join RVC 5 Baker Ring and other Region 5 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 5 in particular.
1:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

London SIG Meet-and-Greet

1:30 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Strategic Planning for Your Local Group
Trevor Mitchell, Elissa Rudolph

Strategic planning can seem like one of those complex processes that is time intensive, and most volunteers don’t know where to start or how much time it will take. In this session, we will share the importance of strategic planning and how to make the process easier and manageable for volunteers. Good and bad examples illustrate crucial points
1:30 p.m. (Room 214)

Make Your Print Content Mean Something
Teresa Gregory, Chip Taulbee

Any Local Group Newsletter Editor who’s ever printed a typo knows how closely members pay attention to the publications. For many members, their newsletter is their primary point of contact with Mensa – all the more reason to make the most of your Local Group’s periodical. At this LDW, longtime Central Indiana Mensa Mind Editor Teresa Gregory and Bulletin Editor Chip Taulbee will cover the fundamental elements of a quality newsletter, detail pitfalls to avoid and highlight some of the better features and practices Newsletter Editors are employing. Ideal for both new and seasoned editors.
1:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Computers and the Arts — Blessing or Bane?"

Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) has made a place for itself in Hollywood, and you can't escape Auto-Tune in pop music. Yes, they can create effects that challenge unaided humans, but isn't confronting that challenge what art is about? Should audiences value the effect or the effort? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
1:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Mexican Train Dominoes Tournament
Anne McFarlane

Mexican Train is a game played with a set of double-12 dominoes. The object of the game is to play all the dominoes from your hand onto one or more chains, or "trains," emanating from a central hub or "station." The game will consist of randomized tables of 5 - 6 people each, and we will play for a fixed number of rounds. The player with the lowest score wins. Hard copies of the rules will be available near the sign-up sheet in the Tournament Room. All aboard!!
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

The Auschwitz Album and an Auschwitz Survivor's Testimony
Julius Eisenstein

This presentation deals with: 1) The Auschwitz Album, the only surviving visual evidence of the process leading to the mass murder at Auschwitz-Birkenau. It's a unique document that portrays the story of the passengers of one deportation transport that arrived at Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, on May 26, 1944. This album introduces the use of photographs as historical documents that, together with additional sources such as letters and testimonies, help create a comprehensive view of a certain historical event, and to put a human face on it's victims. 2) Testimony and Q&A with Auschwitz survivor Julius Eisenstein.
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Leading Difficult People: The Role of Emotional Intelligence
Jené Kapela

We all know people we find challenging. The good news is you can still work effectively with these people – if you choose to do so. This session is designed to explore the foundation of Emotional Intelligence and provide participants with tools to better understand and lead others. EQ – not IQ – is the strongest predictor of leadership success. That’s because emotional intelligence helps us understand and manage our relationships with others. Self-awareness is the foundation of emotional intelligence. This interactive session will help participants develop greater self-awareness, and thus a greater capacity for emotional intelligence. Through reflection and small group interaction, participants will come to understand how to use emotional intelligence to create better relationships with others. This session is designed for anyone who wants to become more effective in working with other people. For more information: kapelaleadershipsolutions.com
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Preparing Your Student for College: What to Look for and How to Get in!
Brenda Rudman

Competition for acceptance to colleges and universities is at an all-time high. Getting accepted into highly selective colleges has become more and more difficult due to a rapidly growing applicant pool. Parents and middle and high school students are invited to get real and practical answers to crucial questions about what students need to know about preparing for the college admissions process. Seminar topics will include: what should my student do now to prepare for college; how can my student get into the college of his or her choice; how early should my child start the college admission process; what should my student look for when choosing and visiting a college; what role do grades, standardized tests, course load and extracurricular activities play in college admissions; and more.
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Misguided Mensan Adventures in the Connecticut Department of Corrections
Jason Denolfo

Have you ever wanted to know if the prison life in "the movies" is real or fictional? Have you ever wanted to learn what the day-to-day life and struggles of correctional staff are? Come join Mensa's own Jason DeNolfo as he describes to you the culture of prison life as he has experienced it for the last 11 years as a correction officer in the Connecticut Department of Corrections. Discover how a career in corrections can affect an individual not only behind prison walls, but how it affects one's personal life outside. What is the experience of an individual who has been accused and is just entering prison? How does a correctional staff member address all the ethical dilemmas that are faced on a daily basis? This no-holds barred presentation will address these controversial topics and more.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Hollywood Looks at Itself
Howard Gross

Howard Gross, who has given presentations on such topics as "Hedy Lamarr, Inventor" and "Writer's Cramp" (about the experiences of Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald and Salinger in Hollywood), now brings you an inside look at the movies. He will discuss the lighter view (such as Jean Harlow's "Bombshell" and "Singin' In the Rain") and the darker view ("Sunset Boulevard" and "The Bad and the Beautiful"). Yes, you'll hear about the 1937 and 1954 versions of "A Star Is Born," how they differ yet are equally entertaining. He will even include the French-made "The Artist," an affectionate look at early Hollywood. You'll laugh, you'll cry... but you won't be bored!
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

The CIA’s Magician: The Case of the Top Secret Magic Spy Manuals
Neil Caesar

In 1953, the newly formed Central Intelligence Agency created the now infamous research division MK Ultra. That same year, MK Ultra secretly contracted with renowned magician John Mulholland to write two manuals teaching spies how to use magic to deliver information, poison or other drugs to their “audience.” The scholarly and urbane Mulholland never revealed this project to his colleagues in the magic community. In 1973, CIA Director Richard Helms ordered all MK Ultra documents destroyed. In 2007, one copy of each of the two magic spy manuals was discovered. In 2010, these manuals were made available to the public. Life Member Neil Caesar, a serious magic nut, was stunned by these revelations. He will share this fascinating confluence of the worlds of magic and espionage. Secrets will be revealed! Be sure your security clearances are in place. The Magicians’ Oath will be administered onsite.
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Turn Your Life Experience Into Income Through Infopreneurship
Bailey Richert

Mensans have many talents we have honed over the years. Whether they are hobbies we've taught ourselves, skills learned from work or knowledge garnered from education, nearly all of us are experts at something, and we want to share with the world. Do all Mensans realize, though, that you don't have to become a college professor to share that life experience with others, or to profit from it? "Infopreneurship" is a type of business ownership that allows any individual, regardless of credential, age, title or any other demographic, to create informational products like ebooks, online courses, virtual summits and more to establish themselves as an expert, spread their message, teach others and make income. So whether it's knitting, medicine, marketing, watercolor painting, astronomy, board games or something else entirely, you have the power in today's digital world to spread that life experience through infopreneurship.
3:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Region 8 Meet-and-Greet
Sandra Lackovic

Join RVC 8 Sandra Lackovic and other Region 8 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 8 in particular.
3:00 p.m. (Room 217)

Region 9 Meet-and-Greet
Michael Wong

Join the newly elected RVC 9 and other Region 9 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 9 in particular.
3:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Ski SIG Meet-and-Greet
Suzanne Wills

3:00 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Fast and Effective Business Meetings
Jason Seiler

We’ve all been in meetings that went too long, were disorganized, got nothing done and were a complete waste of time. This workshop will lead you through a discussion and give you instruction on how to avoid these and other pitfalls when conducting your own meetings.
3:00 p.m. (Room 214)

Social Media — Which Channels Are You On?
Taz Criss, Scott Snider

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. Pages, Groups, Events. Are you saving your Snaps? Is your Insta avi on point? Do you know what any of these words mean? Taz and Scott will help you understand the difference between a Facebook Page and a Group — and why your Local Group should probably be using both. We'll talk posting frequency, where to scoop the best content for our high-minded audience and more. Learn the basics of how local groups can leverage social media to help with both recruitment and retention.
3:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Do You See a Movie for the Names or the Story?"

Hollywood's star system was built on the idea that a film's big draw was the recognizable faces on the screen, from Myrna Loy to Elizabeth Taylor. More recently the word "bankable" has been applied to directors as well as to actors. Does that theory hold up in your experience or do you put more weight on the title or the genre or on the critical verdicts? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Dances with Words
Richard Lederer, Bill Stanek

Now in the third year of a successful musical partnership, Mensa Bulletin senior columnist Richard Lederer and musical comedian Bill Shipper once again conspire to deliver a fun-filled session exploring wordplay in music and song. These two sparring punsters will deliver newly musicalized linguistic gems and learning disguised as hilarity. Past AG concerts by this delightful duo have ginned up ginormous grins, and this year’s performance is sure to surprise and surpass.
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

An Immigrant’s Journey Into The Cosmos
Dr. Nebil Misconi

Dr. Nebil Misconi will discuss his recent book, An Immigrant’s Journey Into The Cosmos. A summary of the political upheavals in Baghdad, Iraq and the Middle East as he was growing up will be presented. He will describe his TV experience in Baghdad with one hair-raising moment. He chronicles his unique journey into astronomy in the U.S. and his solar system research in Interplanetary Dust Dynamics, comets and asteroids. His laser-particle levitation experiment will be explained in an attempt to simulate IDD in space, and his involvement in the 1980s “Star War” program as a spin-off research. Later on, he also conducted the first rocket launch in Mexico’s history to observe the total solar eclipse, and another NASA launch from the Wallops Island Facility. Dr. Misconi will also describe his idea of destroying comets or asteroids that may destroy our civilization. He had interesting dialogues with astronaut Buzz Aldrin and other famous astronomers and astrophysicists.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Neither Here nor There: Children of the First Immigrants from Castro’s Cuba
Cecilia M. Fernandez

As millions of Cubans have settled into Florida, and beyond, in the last 58 years, few remember the pioneers who paved the way for this mass exodus — not only establishing the largest Cuban enclave in the world, but enabling immigration from all Latin American countries. They were a distinct group of middle class professionals, entrepreneurs and white and blue collar workers who stopped looking back. Their children, absorbing their parent’s nostalgia, were the first to bridge a divided identity that left them embracing and rejecting their Cubanness and their Americanness at once. Cecilia M. Fernandez, author of Leaving Little Havana: A Memoir of Miami’s Cuban Ghetto, discusses the bilingual, bicultural, binational state of limbo for many of those perceived to have had no choice in coming to a foreign land. (See: ceciliamfernandez.com. Email: fernandezcm@bellsouth.net)
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

GeekJobPal: Taking an Idea and Making It Happen
Annika Thurlow

In 2014, Annika spoke at the American Mensa Annual Gathering about MProve: an employment initiative for Mensans. As getting employed in an increasingly competitive job market can seem like an incredibly daunting task, Annika proposed MProve to provide Mensans with employment skills in an online course run by Mensans, for Mensans. When it became clear that a nonprofit did not have the necessary resources needed to provide these services, Annika took a different approach to the problem. Starting GeekJobPal and TechJobPal, Annika hopes to provide people with interviewing tips, resume writing advice, soft skills and navigating social cues, information on how to network, and the ability to make the perfect presentation. People learn differently, so JobPal offers one-on-one sessions, practical skills workshops, webinars and more. Come hear the story so far, what the programs look like and what the future for the JobPal family holds.
4:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

SCUBA SIG Meet-and-Greet
Ann Faget

4:30 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Leadership Opportunities in Mensa
Billie Lee, Becky Folger

“Should you put Mensa on your resume?” It's one of the most popular questions members ask. The general consensus is: “It depends on the company, but you definitely can if you are talking about your volunteer or leadership experience!” During this session, we will go over the many different roles available at the local and national level, the time commitment and work involved, qualifications needed and expectations of Mensa volunteers. You will find out what it takes to successfully lead a population of Extremely Smart People, as well as learn about the support you can get from the National Office. This session is highly recommended for members new and old who want to give back to the organization through their skills, expertise and enthusiasm.
4:30 p.m. (Room 214)

Digital Content Creation
Scott Snider

Are you ready to unleash and productize transparent users? Maybe you just want to orchestrate open-source information flows. Maybe, just maybe, you'd like to know more about — without endless buzzwords and marketing B.S. — how to create and leverage digital content (read: words, pictures) on your website and social accounts to build community and grow your local group. Well, maybe I can help. Let's chat about how, with a little work up front, you can easily make the web work for you.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Beyond Medicine: Why Yes Dear, That Is Marijuana
Jodi James

Around the globe people are talking about cannabis, an ancient medicine, mild psychedelic, modern job creator and a multi-million dollar legal and illegal industry. Jodi James, a 20-plus-year veteran of the war on drugs leads this frank conversation about the plant. James takes participants on a journey through the highs and lows of America’s infatuation with pot. Together you will explore the benefits of the plant, the harms of prohibition and the politics behind the laws. Where we go from here is up to you.
4:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Euchre Tournament
Tammy Hicks

Euchre (“YOU-ker”) is a trick-taking card game usually played in two-player teams using traditional playing cards. We will generally play according to the standard description found in the Wikipedia entry for “Euchre,” but each round will run maximum of 20 minutes, with winning teams advancing to the next round. Players without partners can pair up in the Tournament Room before play begins. This tournament is for experienced players only; not a time to learn the game.  Bring your dinner in with you!  You may learn the game by attending the learning session in the Games Room at noon on Thursday.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

When Caring Hurts: Helping Caregivers Get the Support They Need
Viki Kind

Research has shown that caregivers may die four to eight years sooner if they don’t get the help they need. Whether you are caring for a child, spouse/partner/significant other, friend or a family member, caregivers can quickly get overwhelmed by the responsibilities. Viki will share with you how to get past your resistance to asking for help and how to use a four-step process to help you get the support you need. Attendees will learn how to say no when people are asking for too much and how to say yes to take time for yourself. This is an interactive course where caregivers will create action plans that they can use right away. Viki will also share resources to help you find support in your community.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Understanding Police Use of Force
Dave Bryant

This lecture/demonstration will provide information on a highly politicized, controversial subject. It will NOT be a town hall style format for arguing. It will provide our intelligent members real insight on the training, mindset and brutal reality of making the decision to use force, including deadly force. We will talk about law, ethics, tactics and psychology. Given the nature of the topic and graphic, violent images that will be shown, this class is recommended only for mature members. This presenter is an active career law enforcement officer in Florida who has successfully used every level on the force continuum, including deadly force. He is a police academy instructor and subject matter expert who has testified as an expert witness in court.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Legendary American Political Operative Roger Stone
Roger Stone

An in-depth review of how the 2016 election played out during the primaries and general election. How did this election compare to past contests and how it was dramatically different? Was it the toughest race we have seen in our lifetimes? Key elements of what made the Donald Trump campaign successful and what the post-election radicalism really means to American democracy. Examination of the efforts by the media and Democrats trying to manufacture a "Russian Connection" between  Trump and top allies... is this the new McCarthyism? How will President Trump deliver on his promises to secure the border, revamp our economy, improve our armed forces and take care of our veterans? Presentation would conclude explaining why the mainstream media will be extinct or irrelevant in the coming years.
5:45 p.m. (Room 217)

Isolated M Family Reunion
Ruth Danielle

Current Isolated Ms, former members and other curious people renew acquaintances and make new friends. Isolated M was started by Harper Fowley in 1974 and now has 700+ members in more than 80 countries (from A to V). Bring your stories about being isolated (or not), travel adventures and retest incidents...but no feghoots!
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Quantum 101: An Introduction to Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Computers
Timmy King

Strange things happen in the quantum world. Information moves across the universe instantly. Particles travel backward in time to change experimental results. Electrons jump through walls whenever they feel like it. And today, scientists are taking this weird science and building weird computers that will someday process a trillion bits of information in just a few seconds. In the future, our government will be able to use quantum computers to decrypt all data on the Internet. In this session we will look at quantum computers and the quantum mechanics needed to make them work. The talk is 50 percent history lesson, 50 percent science lecture and 100 percent fun. It’s appropriate for all ages, and no scientific knowledge/skill is required.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Employing Creative Pedagogy in Developing Nations
Linda Khachadurian

How does a nonprofit with insufficient funds educate a village of children? In her presentation, Linda — the founder of Charitable Confections, a volunteer-run educational organization that operates in Haiti and Armenia — will discuss the creative pedagogical approaches she has implemented in Cite Soleil — Port-au-Prince's most destitute and gang-ridden slum — and in Yerevan. These methods, carried out via her organization's "charity du jour," or partner nonprofits, Haiti Scholarship Association and Armenian Missionary Association of America, include peer-to-peer Skype sessions with children in first world countries that foster cross-cultural exchange and learning; adult-to-child virtual tutoring via Skype and Facebook messenger in Haiti; virtual classroom teaching with Harvard and MIT professors and students in Armenia; and fundraising for tuition via unique events such as a formal dinner with an edible robot named Confectionbot, who will accompany Linda to the Mensa event.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

The First Astronomers: The Paleolithic Synthesis of Visual Art, Myth and Natural Science
Christopher Kilgore

France's Lascaux Cave contains many of the most spectacular and well-known works of Paleolithic art. These Cro-Magnon paintings, more than 17,000 years old, include the most intriguing and enigmatic of all cave art — the Shaft Scene. These fragile paintings at the bottom of a well in the depths of the cave seem to have an implicit narrative, but scholars disagree as to its meaning. Is it allegorical or literal? Does it represent a masked shaman in trance, surrounded by dream figures? Or perhaps an unfortunate hunter dead at the feet of his mortally wounded prey? Chris Kilgore's revolutionary interpretation answers these questions definitively, elucidating the images as the earliest evidence yet found of astronomical knowledge. Kilgore will demonstrate that the insights captured in these fragile paintings have survived, encoded as myth. Preserved in a sophisticated pre-literate mnemonic system, these astronomical insights spread throughout the prehistoric world and survive to this day.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

What We Have Learned in Eight Years of Bigfoot Research
Carl Hartline

I have been researching Bigfoot creatures in the Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas areas for eight years. During that time, other researchers and I, have discovered many previously unreported facts about Bigfoot through observations and field research. We have found out about their movement, mimicking, groups changing members, intelligence indicators and language. We have seen how the creatures react to different equipment used to photograph and record them. We have developed height estimates based on foot size, as verified by researchers' personal experience. If you have any interest in these creatures, please plan to attend.
6:00 p.m. (Room 217)

L'ChaiM SIG Meet-and-Greet
Rick Magnus

Come join fellow Jewish Mensans as we welcome the Sabbath.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Going Dark: The Power of Information Privacy
Tom Galanis

Today's world brings us a great deal of information to our fingertips and also opens up a spiderweb of our own information, which can make us tremendously vulnerable. How can we secure our privacy, stay anonymous and be safe? This session will introduce you to methods of privacy using free and open-source software and operating systems, mail encryption, the Tor network, an insight into how hard drive and mobile device encryption work and more. You'll learn simple and easy ways to manage your online identity — it's not as hard as you might think! This session is open to all levels and will engage in a discussion about the hot topics associated with privacy.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Muon Monitoring
Cioli Barazandeh

The current Standard Model of Fundamental Particles has been able to describe in a single mathematical pattern all visible matter (4 percent of the mass of the universe). It thus states that this matter consists of six electron-like leptons and six quarks making known nuclei and atoms and many unstable particles created in high-energy particle collisions. The remaining 96 percent of the Universe is made from a still mysterious set of “dark matter” and “dark energy.” The muon, an unstable lepton particle, is effectively a massy version of the electron. Muons are present in the secondary cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere, and are one of the few particles to reach in large numbers a sea level environment. They decay into three other leptons: an electron and two neutrinos, which in our experiment escape undetected. The speaker will explain her experiment, which registers the arrival and stopping of a muon as a voltage pulse, and how it could be used in applications for modern-day society.
7:00 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Gala Dinner with speaker Penn Jillette
Penn Jillette

Penn & Teller's live show spent years on Broadway and is now the longest-running headliner show in Las Vegas. In addition to his numerous television appearances, philanthropy work and popular podcast, Penn has written two books, the latest of which is Presto!, a New York Times best-seller that takes an insightful and humorous look at his recent weight-loss journey.  On the big screen, he produced the critically lauded 2005 documentary The Aristocrats and last-year’s Tim's Vermeer, which follows the journey of an eccentric inventor determined to solve one of the art world’s oldest mysteries.  (This is a ticketed event, not an open AG event.)
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Intuitive Tarot for Daily Guidance
Kelly Galanis

Discover more about yourself with an intuitive Tarot reading! Kelly Galanis will guide the audience through the fun and engaging ways to do a reading, and help you understand how to practice Tarot in your daily life. Using both traditional Tarot and contemporary decks such as Lenormand, Kipper, Oracle and fortune cards, she has found reading the Tarot to be a vital source offering guidance in everyday life. Come learn how these fun and exciting readings can help benefit and guide you towards the answers you seek! All experience levels are welcome at this talk, and those who are curious, cynical or believers are encouraged to attend.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Hitler, Satan and Me: A Love Story
Kristin Anderson

This presentation is an account of evil at work. Setting the stage with a look at Hitler’s indoctrination of German boys, Anderson takes us through 25 years of marriage to a former Hitler Youth and the subtle aftermath of their divorce. She lays open the increasing combat with demonic forces. Pranks, physical injuries and attempts to kill her target her as she remains determined to shine light on this lurking, invisible evil force. With anecdotes from her Fringe Festival play of the same name and her memoir, "Standing in Deep Water: Overcoming the Infectious Legacy of the Hitler Youth," she takes us through her dark valley to ultimate victory. Those who have a father or grandfather who belonged to Hitler Youth will learn about their own heritage and its consequences. Those who believe in the devil will discover how to recognize and counter his subtle slithering in their lives.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Jesus’ Insights vs. Christianity’s Fallacy
Thomas Nehrer

Jesus spoke of a Kingdom “within” and illustrated this state of mind in his parables. But the primitive, superstitious mindset of the first century turned his insights into blatant myth and fantasy with miracles and phony claims of divine impregnation and deified status. Tom shows just what Jesus meant as he illustrated the functional Oneness of Consciousness with Reality in allegorical terms — the only possibility of communicating advanced concepts to the primitive peasant which was his audience. Tom will provide background on Jesus' contemporary setting — first century Judea — and the common mindset of his peers, awash in superstition and powerlessness. And he'll explain, as detailed in his third book, The Illusion of "Truth", how Christianity grew out of myth and lore about an exaggerated, fantasized Jesus while ignoring the real teachings of the actual man, Yeshua.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

An Introduction to Practical Gemology
Joseph Haber

Joe will present a basic introduction to practical gemology. This will include a discussion and demonstration of the three essential instruments that are the basis of gemological testing. The instruments are: the Hand Loupe, the Dichroscope and the Chelsea Filter. These simple tools can be used to identify almost 90% of the gemstones you are most likely to find in jewelry. The audience will learn the proper usage of these basic tools. Joe will also give a brief overview of some of the more advanced tools used by gemologists. If time permits, Joe will conduct a hands-on workshop that will provide an opportunity to try using the three basic tools. At the conclusion of his program, Joe will provide reference notes.
7:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Perquackey Tournament
Charles Godfrey

Perquackey is a three-minute word-search game. Players are given a pre-determined selection of approximately 12 letters and try to find words of at least three letters in length (then four, then five, etc.) by arranging and rearranging the given letters. Bonus points are awarded for completing consecutive word-length columns of five words each.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Video 101
Bruce Mathews

In today's world we are surrounded by video and have to make decisions about how to deal with it. How do I view TV? Broadcast, satellite, cable or just use the web? Do I use DVD, Blu-ray or video files? And what are all those formats? What do 720p, 1080i and 1080p mean? Why is this picture the wrong size? Why can't I buy a HiDef TV anymore; what's this UHD instead? I shot great video, but when I post it on the web it looks like crap. What happened? Let a professional video engineer explain it. There is something for everyone: Goths (blacker than black), criminals (illegal colors), psychics (prediction) and SciFi fans (backward through time).
9:00 p.m. (Room 216)

BDSMensans: Smart Kinksters
Rob Salkin

What's hotter than someone who shares your kink? Someone who shares your kink and can hold an intellectual conversation post-aftercare! This semi-structured Meet-and-Greet event is for anyone with a kink curiosity, regardless of experience. All will be welcome to ask and answer questions about any aspect of the kink community, including how to get involved online and with local kink communities.
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

The Anatomy of a Financial Thriller: The Creation of "A Child's Game"
Kenneth Campbell

A novel that covers the next two years of our financial world. Bankers are once again called in front of a Congressional Committee to explain what they knew, when they knew it and what they did about it. This is a presentation of the facts that went into the writing of this novel and how they lead to one undeniable conclusion that we cannot escape. Once the audience knows the facts, they will change their personal financial approach to the next 24 months and beyond. The question they will be forced to deal with: What is Hopscotch, and what is its role in the second Great Depression?
9:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Werewolves of Ziggy Hollow
Bill Zigo

Werewolves have moved into the peaceful village of Ziggy Hollow, and it is up to the townspeople to kill them before they get killed. Ziggy's rules and special characters will be introduced before the start of each game. Adults only please.
9:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Texas Hold-'em Poker Tournament
Stephen Burnham

This is just like the final event of the World Series of Poker that you see on TV, except that our prize is multimillions of dollars smaller. Vie for the glory and for the admiration of your fellow Mensans!
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Two Years in the Red-light District of Tijuana — A Photo Ethnography
Lily J. Noonan

The red-light district of Tijuana, Mexico, has an enforced no-photos policy but photographer Lily J. Noonan has spent the past two years there openly shooting daily life. Her photos document many rarely captured moments in the Zona Norte, including the homes of prostitutes, deportees, the drug culture, in-room sessions and street life. For each person she photographs, she learns their story and will share their lives with the audience. Due to the graphic nature of some photographs, this presentation is for mature audiences.

Saturday, July 8

8:00 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Yoga "all levels" Vinyasa class with a spiritual intention. Bring a mat/towel. Fitness attire.
Ken Heptig

Ken Heptig, author of "Yoga Secrets", will lead you through a series of yoga poses.  He will give modifications for less or more to keep everyone challenged. Bring a mat or large towel and your sense of humor. Fitness attire recommended. This is not an introduction to yoga class. Ken believes the spiritual intentions are the most valuable part of yoga and can help you find a better life. Yoga studios throughout the United States use his book Yoga Secrets: 52 Life-Changing Secrets. Ken refined the intentions in his book while teaching thou­­sands of yoga classes. He improved the intentions for simplicity and clarity until his students could absorb the intentions while practicing different levels of yoga. The book is suitable for anyone with or without a physical practice of yoga. Use the intentions on your own or add them to a group activity like sporting events, classrooms, and yoga classes. http://goalyoga.com
9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

The State-of-the-Art in Privately Owned Submersibles
Jarl Stromer

Today, it’s becoming almost commonplace to find small, privately owned submersibles being operated from mega-yachts. The era of the personal mini-sub is upon us. While many would characterize this phenomenon as nascent, it was in fact predicted in the magazine Popular Science more than 50 years ago. This presentation will look back at those early predictions and discuss which came true, which didn’t and why. The state-of-the-art in small manned submersible design, construction, operation and ownership will be discussed
9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

New To Miles And Points? Get Ready to Design Your Dream Vacation!
Pamela Krupa-Jeschonek

It is possible to take a once-in-a-lifetime trip (or many!) using airline miles and hotel points to significantly cut down on costs or travel for free. But if you are a newbie to miles and points, where do you start? Discover the questions to ask yourself before earning a single mile toward your dream vacation. It all starts with the design!
9:00 a.m. (Room 217)

Meet the National Ombudsman
Garrison "Bud" Klueck

Join Bud Klueck, American Mensa's National Ombudsman, and several regional and local group ombudsmen for a free-ranging discussion of the role of ombudsmen and how Mensa's conflicts and complaints can be resolved informally without disciplinary action.
9:00 a.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Taking Care of Your Volunteers
Bill Zigo

Mensa is a volunteer organization, and we're all volunteers. But every volunteer had to start somewhere. Volunteers go through periods of learning, periods of good and bad performance, and unfortunately, burnout. Bill will cover ways to bring new volunteers on board more efficiently, how to work with volunteers being challenged, and how to deal with re-enthusing - or dismissing gracefully - volunteers who have burned out or lost interest, to hopefully get them excited again.
9:00 a.m. (Room 214)

The Treasure Map of Local Group Resources

9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Essential Oils and Herbs for Health and Happiness
Master Elrick the Apothecary Elrick

Join master and apprentice to learn about the origin of "spices" and magical or medicinal uses of common herbs. Samples available.
9:00 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Malthus at the Barricades"

“Immigration" is such a 20th century word.  What's happening now is "population flow" driven by depleted soils, pumped-dry aquifers, coastal cities pummeled by storms and rising seas, and ever more people struggle over ever scarcer resources. Assimilation systems designed to accommodate hundreds or thousands of newcomers are now faced with millions. Have national boundaries become irrelevant save as taxing districts? Has “globalization” prevailed in a way we never expected? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
9:00 a.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Registration for the American Mensa Admission Test

Proctors will register candidates for the American Mensa Admissions Test. The special AG test fee is $30. Test candidates must be at least 14 years of age, provide a photo ID and be a permanent U.S. resident. We will be using our new admission test for this session.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

The Politics of Pathos: Explaining the Refugee Crisis, Globalization and Trump through Aristotle's Lens
Norm Pattis

Are you still reeling after the 2016 election? That's only because you don't understand the politics of pathos. This lively hour attempts the impossible: explaining the refugee crisis, globalization, climate change, human rights, 21st century populism and — yes it's true — Donald Trump. All this through the timeless lens of Aristotle. Bring an open mind. Provocative ideas from best-selling author and syndicated blogger Norm Pattis.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Nursing Home Horrors: A Reversible Epidemic – Shocking Stories and Powerful Solutions
Paul Philips

Nursing home abuse is a massive problem nationally, and it’s getting worse as baby boomers are entering a seriously flawed long-term care infrastructure. CNN chronicled the national epidemic of sexual assault, a congressional study revealed 1 in 3 nursing homes were cited for abuse, and advocate/attorney Paul N. Philips tells us the vast majority of reports are ignored by officials as the imaginings of dementia patients. Paul shares his formula and actions for aggressive repair, plus the legal (and DIY) tools for stopping the horrors, using illustrative stories from today’s headlines. Learn about heroic whistleblowers, hidden cameras, elders fighting back and how victims' families and advocates shine a spotlight on reprehensible conduct to stop the uncaring, the malicious and the head-in-the-sand company leaders that employ them while ignoring their conduct in profit's name. Shocking and useful for anyone who is coming of nursing home age or knows an elder in a long-term care facility.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Banking on Brainpower in the 21st Century
Deborah Mash

The human brain is the last biological frontier. We have learned much about the human brain in the last 20 years, but the answers can't come fast enough. Brain diseases affect an estimated 50 million Americans. Starting at age 65, the risk of dementia doubles every five years. By age 85, between 25 and 50 percent of people show signs of Alzheimer's disease. The CDC estimates that one in 44 boys are born today with a diagnosis of autism.
9:30 a.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

American Mensa Admission Test

Proctors will register candidates for the American Mensa Admissions Test. The special AG test fee is $30. Test candidates must be at least 14 years of age, provide a photo ID and be a permanent U.S. resident. We will be using our new admission test for this session.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Why Rising Sea Level Is Now Unstoppable
John Englander

Rising sea level is commonly confused with unpredictable flooding from storms like “Sandy” or the completely predictable “king tides.” Sea level rise intensifies both of those events but is totally different. It is critical to understand why sea level rise cannot soon be stopped by any of the climate change or CO2 emission plans. Find out why just Greenland and Antarctica will determine the future of coastlines globally. Most importantly, what should we be doing? How high could it rise in the next 30 years and beyond? Why is it different in different places? John Englander wrote the book on the subject — High Tide On Main Street — and goes beyond the headlines and confusion. Now he briefs national security experts, corporate leaders, cities, developers, engineers, architects, attorneys and more. Listen, learn and get your questions answered.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

How Can We "Give Back" as Mensans?
Guy Breading

How can we give back? As Mensans, it is understandable that most of us look at the world, and the problems it presents, through a somewhat different set of lenses. It is recognized that, with our high IQ, we have been blessed with acute reasoning and problem-solving abilities. In this ever-changing world in which we live, where there are both for- and not-for profits that have hit a brick wall and need someone to turn to, could we offer discretionary help? Like the knowledge and expertise to encourage prosperity and stewardship of existing resources within organizations that have the greatest need and whose mission is to provide a positive impact to the well being of society? And, in doing so, could we also become a catalyst for open discussion and encouragement, a light on a hilltop that, through our actions, sends ripples to inspire other organizations to initiate conversations on how they can give back?
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Escaping the Infinite Loop in Your Relationship
Betsy Walli

Due to life experiences, you may have developed patterns of relating to others that make relationships difficult and elicit the very responses you fear. In your relationship, when each person’s response to disconnection inadvertently alarms the other and increases the distance between you, a painful vicious circle ensues. This emotional disconnection can also contribute to recurring arguments about seemingly minor, unrelated issues. Underlying these disagreements are vulnerable hidden questions: Do I matter to you? Can I reach you? Can I count on you if I need you? Using concepts from emotionally focused therapy, you can step out of the negative cycle in which you are stuck, make sense of the expectations, emotions and unmet needs that are driving it and then express your needs and emotions in a way that feels safe to the other person. Once you both feel safely connected, it is easier to resolve your other issues.
10:30 a.m. (Room 217)

Meet the Communications Officer
Tommy Ryan

10:30 a.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Staff Town Hall
National Office Staff

Do you have questions about how the National Office operates? Would you like to put a name with a face? Do you not know all of the people in the office? Here's a great opportunity to join Executive Director Pam Donahoo, Sr. Director of Membership and Strategy Trevor Mitchell, Director of Finance David Peery, Foundation Director Jill Beckham, Communications Director Charles Brown, Director of Strategic Brand Partnerships John McGill and IT Director Matthew Needham for a town hall meeting. This is not a formal presentation. The content will be determined by the audience and what they want to know.
10:30 a.m. (Room 214)

Local Group Funds/Treasuries
Deb Stone

This will be an interactive session where we discuss: What is a fiduciary duty? What are the responsibilities of your Treasurer (or any other officers)? What tools, information or reports do you want or need to do a good job as treasurer? What is the right amount of money to have in your treasury? What are good ways to spend your money? Questions?
10:30 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Gen Y Leadership Session
Henri Buccine-Schraeder

The GenY SIG is for Mensa members born on or between the years of 1976 - 1996. Are you the GenY Coordinator for your Local Group? Do you want to be? Our goal is to have more GenY representation in local groups around the country and the world. Come to the planning session and learn about volunteer opportunities. Share your ideas for making GenY SIG an active force for good and fun in Mensa.
10:30 a.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Globalization: Threat or Opportunity to the U.S.?"

Globalization means U.S. products can be sold anywhere (assuming we produce competitively), but also that your I.T. job could migrate to India in a second. In some quarters the 2016 election was cast as a struggle between the internationalist vision and American exceptionalism. Which strategy will improve the lives of Americans across the country? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
10:30 a.m. (Great Hall 6)

Wizard Tournament
Beth Weiss

A Wizard deck has 60 cards — the 52 we all know and love plus eight blue cards — four Jesters and four Wizards. The trick is to bid your hand and then take exactly as many tricks as you’ve bid. There are no points for “close.” There will be a first round of the tournament where everyone plays, and then a second round of the table winners. Please learn the game before the tournament — people will be playing in the Games Room throughout the AG!
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

The Step: Behind the Scenes of the Brilliant Apollo Launch Team That Made Landing a Man on the Moon Possible
Martha Lemasters

Fasten your seat belts and journey back to the 1960s for a front-row seat as Lemasters recollects in amazing detail the brilliant engineers, analysts, technicians and administrative staff that made up the IBM launch support team at Cape Kennedy. The Apollo team faced challenges and temptations like anyone else in the 60s: divorce, affairs, deaths, three shifts of work — but they knew how to have fun along the way. A chorus was formed; humorous skits brought laughs to facility dinners and tennis bets of a lifetime played out on the Apollo stage. The story captures the human side of the team amid their dedication and focus. If you are a space pioneer, a space fan, or a woman who wants to move through the professional net, this presentation will mesmerize you. What was it like to be a part of these history-making events of launching our astronauts to the moon? Hear it from someone who experienced it all.
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Learning Language: An Overview of Infant Language Acquisition, Measurement and Implications
Amy Tift

One of the most thrilling moments for parents is to hear their child say their first word. Language acquisition is an intricate process and one which developmental psychologists are working to unravel. Follow the developmental pathway from prenatal sound experience to the word explosion in toddlerhood, the important multisensory features of language, as well as the non-obvious factors that underlie language development. The speaker will also describe the methodologies psychologists use to understand and measure infant language development. This research is helping scientists and parents improve their child’s linguistic environment, understand bilingualism and detect developmental delays such as autism.
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Harnessing Ocean Current Power with the Deep Ocean Current Generator
Jarl Stromer

The technology associated with ocean current power generation is presently much less developed than either tidal or wave energy. Because the most concentrated sources of ocean current energy are typically found 100 meters below the ocean surface and in waters with bottom depths of 1,000 meters or more, the technology required to convert ocean currents’ hydrokintetic energy into electricity is inherently more complex and requires innovative and sophisticated solutions. Patrick Lahey is co-founder and President of Triton Energy Systems, LLC. Triton,  founded in 2012 to design, engineer, fabricate, promote and advance the Deep Ocean Current Generator, the key component of a system developed to generate electric power from deep ocean currents. Lahey will discuss the development of the DOCG and its planned application to delivering energy to on-shore consumers.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

How I Came to Write “Shall Not Perish From the Earth”
Ian Randal Strock

Alternate history is a genre of fiction in which one or more historical events occur differently, causing the world as we knew it to evolve differently. It can be a rigorous exploration of how the world came to be. Ian Randal Strock wrote the short story “Shall Not Perish From the Earth” for the alternate history anthology “Altered States of the Union.” For the story, he made a seemingly minor change to the Constitution at the founding of the United States of America and then explored what would happen during Abraham Lincoln’s administration, three-quarters of a century later. In this talk, he’ll delve further into the facts and changes of the story, as well as place it within the wider realm of alternate history.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

The Evitable Connection Between Intelligence and Expertise
David Baker

Insight comes from repeated application of experience in similar circumstances. The opportunity to accomplish that comes from focus, all of which yields pattern matching, which is the essence of intelligence. But turning that insight and intelligence into an entrepreneurial venture requires something very different, and there is no inevitable connection between insight and making money from it. Let's talk about how that happens. David has written five best-selling books and speaks widely around the world. [This is based in part on a my fifth book, arriving in late April, called The Business of Expertise: How Entrepreneurial Experts Convert Insight to Impact + Profit, RockBench Publishing Corp, Nashville. Foreword by Dan Pink.]
12:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Region 10 Meet-and-Greet
Thomas Thomas

Join RVC 10 Thomas Thomas and other Region 10 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 10 in particular.
12:00 p.m. (Room 217)

Region 4 Meet-and-Greet
Jon Gruebele

Join newly elected RVC 4 Jon Gruebele and other Region 4 members to talk about what is going on in Mensa as a whole and Region 4 in particular.
12:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Spirituality Explained by a Materialistic Three Agent Model of Consciousness
Frank Heile

A new "three-agent model" of consciousness is used to explain spirituality and spiritually enlightened states. The three separate-but-interconnected proposed agents are the "Thinker," "Doer" and "Experiencer." The Thinker is the conscious agent in the normal modern human. In non-human animals, the Doer is the conscious agent. Spirituality arose during the transition from being a conscious Doer to being a conscious Thinker. The very useful Thinker allowed humans to dominate the world by developing science, technology and modern civilization. However, the Thinker also causes suffering for individual modern humans since it amplifies and prolongs negative emotions such as resentments and fears. Spirituality and spiritual practices, such as meditation and prayer can decrease identification with the Thinker and alleviate some of that suffering. Finally, spiritually enlightened states occur when there is no identification with the Thinker and, instead, life is lived as an Experiencer only.
12:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Immigration and the U.S. Economy"

Silicon Valley and agribusiness claim we need even more immigrants. The Administration wants fewer. What are the practical limits and risks to opening borders or closing them? Must we choose between uniting families and importing brains and entrepreneurs? Why should the United States overload its capacity to offset global instability, or are we not even close to capacity? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
12:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Quiddler Tournament
Debbie Freeland

Quiddler is a card game that combines the word-building of Scrabble with rummy-like rules. Players must combine progressively larger hands of cards into words, with the goal of earning the most points. Although it may appear that the person who knows the most words would consistently win, this isn’t the case. There’s an element of strategy — players must choose whether to “go out” or wait to increase the odds of getting the bonus for longest word or most words. Novices are welcome, but they’re advised to study up on two- and three-letter words if they want to be competitive.
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Whistleblowers — Big Cash Rewards for Low Profile People Exposing Corporate Misconduct and Health Care Cheats
Brian Mahany

Corporate misconduct is rampant — banks cheat customers, defense contractors double or triple bill the U.S., major pharma companies knowingly sell subpar or defective drugs, and health care providers from hospitals to ambulance companies cheat Medicare while patients suffer the consequences and U.S. taxpayers foot the bill for fraud. Author Brian Mahany is an expert at helping people expose these cheats, stop the fraud and earn large cash rewards provided for in several little-known U.S. laws. Learn how whistleblower heroes, often employees, stand up to mega banks, big pharma, evil defense contractors, and health care providers gone rogue. Shocking stories from the headlines: Brian's $16 billion win vs. Bank of America for their role in the mortgage crisis, drugs we all buy at the pharmacy adulterated at overseas factories yet sold anyway in the name of profit, a doc telling healthy patients they have cancer to sell chemo, etc. Intriguing insights from U.S. whistleblower expert Mahany.
12:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Aguadilla, Puerto Rico 2013: An Unknown Flying Object Detected by Homeland Security
Robert Powell, MUFON Director of Research

On April 25, 2013, at about 9:20 p.m. local time, an unknown object at low altitude flew directly across the Rafael Hernandez airport runway at Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, causing a delayed departure of a commercial aircraft. There was no squawking transponder signal to alert the aircraft tower, nor was there any communication with the tower to prevent a dangerous situation with departing and arriving aircraft. Fortunately an airborne U.S. Customs and Border Protection aircraft captured the object on infrared video. This presentation is a summary of an analytical evaluation of that video as well as witness statements and radar data of the incident. For more information see explorescu.org or contact Robert at robertmaxpowell@gmail.com.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Vera Rubin's Presentation to the Mensa Colloquium: "Revolution in Cosmology"
Judy Keating

Astronomer Vera Rubin passed away in 2016. A decade prior, 300 of us had the pleasure of meeting her and hearing her "The Universe of Galaxies" presentation at our Colloquium in Albany, N.Y. That presentation was videotaped and will be shown at this presentation. Here is her abstract from that presentation: "Every civilization, from the time of the earliest humans to the present day, tells stories abut the universe. What is known in each epoch reflects mostly the available technology. Today astronomers know that bright galaxies and clusters of galaxies populate the universe, but make up less than 10% of its matter. The remaining matter is dark, and is inferred by its gravitational effect on the bright matter that we study. Following a brief discussion of the early history, I will tell the story of the bright universe that we know, and the dark universe that is obscure."
1:30 p.m. (Room 216)

Local Treasurer's/Budget Makers Meet-and-Greet
Deb Stone

Come meet Local Group Treasurers and group/event budget-makers, as well as the national Treasurer. This will be a Meet-and-Greet event with some suggested topics of discussion, including getting the biggest bang for your buck, keeping the right amount of money in the bank and sharing best practices year-round.
1:30 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Prospects, From Start to Finish
Timothy Brooks, Jennifer Jewell

1:30 p.m. (Room 214)

Local Group Reports
Matthew Needham

1:30 p.m. (Room 217)

Atheist Meet-and-Greet
Ed You

This atheist, agnostic, humanist, etc. meet-and-greet can be “hosted” by anyone that is motivated to lead the discussions, with Ed You as the default host. This forum is for you, whether you want to discuss atheist reading lists, other atheist groups, the politics of atheism, how religious oppression impedes you from coming out of the atheist closest, or if you simply want to meet others that share atheist/agnostic values.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Awards Presentation and 2018 AG Kickoff

Celebrate the accomplishments of Mensa members and Local Groups at our awards presentation. Share the highlights of the year and see which groups win big! All members are welcome to attend. Afterwards, get the grand preview of the 2018 Annual Gathering, "Monumentally Mindbending!" in Indianapolis, Indiana.
1:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

GenX SIG Meet-and-Greet #2
Tracey Guice

For Gen Xers who watched as video killed the radio star, and all we could do is stand by and mutter "I want my MTV!" In hopes of finding that we have more in common than just our 2 percent, we welcome all Mensans born from January 1961 through December 1981. This is a group of GenX Ms, by GenX Ms, and for GenX Ms.
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Trash Bowl
Charlie Steinhice

Trash Bowl is a quizbowl-style, buzz-in team competition of esoteric knowledge, with the focus on pop culture — movies, music, sports, TV, games, junk food, comics, you name it.  Hosted by your genial quizmaster, Charlie Steinhice, a.k.a. the Ghost of Quizbowl Past. Fun for spectators, unless they blurt out answers and earn the Withering Glance of Death. Field limited to 64 players, with advance sign-up recommended. Sign up individually or in pairs; you’ll be grouped into teams of four players.
1:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "No Longer the Home of the Brave?"

Terrorism is the intentional generation of fear for political purposes. American politicians have been practicing terrorism since before the Goldwater campaign. Trouble is, they've gotten good at it, and the American electorate has encouraged them. Have we become permanent cravens? If not, how do we make that strategy not work any more? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
1:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Bridge Tournament
Stephen Burnham

This is the continuation of Ed Becker's "friendly bridge tournament." Players must know how to play bridge, but may be new to duplicate bridge. Players may arrange their own partnerships or may sign up individually and be paired up on the spot. A maximum of 40 participants is allowed due to logistical constraints, but alternates may sign up in case someone does not show up.
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

You Be the Investigator
Cookie Bakke

Criminal fraud investigators (the real ones, not ones on TV) seldom win in an hour or even what constitutes a television season. Sure, smoking guns and a dozen eye witnesses can happen, but it's a rarity. In this session, Cookie intends to take full advantage of the tens of thousands of IQ points in the audience as she presents one of her real death case investigations — as of this writing unsolved "beyond a reasonable doubt" — and then opens the mic to Q&As and full audience participation/suggestions. Please, no young children. Mature teens accompanied by a parent allowed, but be advised that discussion content can be graphic/disturbing. Caveat: Names and locations will be changed to protect the victims and the suspects.
1:30 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Native American-style Drum Circle
Rick McBride, aka Cante Lute

Cultures are informed largely by the subtleties embedded in language in everything from mundane assumptions to world views and beyond. The nonreligious spiritual and life-wisdom, the connection to Unci Maka (Grandmother Earth) and to “all our relations” of North American Indigenes is further supported and brought to life through powerful ceremonial songs. Join in this drum circle where songs will be sung in the Lakota language, then explained in English. We’ll have fun, too! (No photos please.)
1:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Game Theory Experiments
Marcelo Guerra Hahn

In this presentation we will run some experiments (a.k.a. play some games) that illustrate the motivation for Game Theory. After each round we will look at what the "best strategy" (or lack thereof) is for them. We will also analyze the theoretical equilibrium and maximum potential gains. Come prepared to help your team make some strategic decisions and have fun! Note: Previous knowledge/experience with game theory may or may not help your team win this time. Prizes will be adjusted by inflation.
1:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Seeing the Marine Environment through Microbial and Genomics Lenses
Dr. Jose V. Lopez, Ph.D

DNA comprises the genetic code and common thread of all life on the planet. Our NSU molecular genomics laboratory focuses on the genomic sequences from marine organisms and essential microbes in diverse projects. For example, we are trying to better understand food webs and microbial distributions in the deep ocean through the DEEPEND project after the Deewater Horizon oil spill (see deependconsortium.org) to “symbiotic” interactions between host and benefical microbes living together For example, see bioluminescent symbionts of anglerfish at ocean.si.edu/ocean-news/meet-tiny-bacteria-give-anglerfishes-their-spooky-glow, to supporting the Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance or GIGA (see GIGA-cos.org), which helps study the genomes and evolutionary origins of diverse marine animals (such as invertebrate sponges and corals) that help make up the tree of life.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Penguins, Not Polar Bears: Travel to the End of the World
Marcia Brandes

Join Marcia and Steve on their expedition to Antarctica, South Georgia and the Falkland Islands. There are, of course, no polar bears in the Antarctic. But there are hundreds of thousands of penguins and albatrosses, as well as petrels and other birds, seals, whales, ice-covered mountains and sculpted icebergs. Marcia will take you on visits to rookeries and an old whaling station, snow covered trails and the notorious Drake Passage. You'll learn what to expect on a trip to the frozen continent, what to pack and the difference between an expedition and a cruise. Best of all, Marcia will share stunning photos of all of these experiences.
3:00 p.m. (Room 217)

Friends of Bill W

For Mensans and guests who are actively practiving any 12-step program. This is a non-hosted, informal program, not for observers or the curious, please.
3:00 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

Getting Young Adult Mensans Involved
Timothy Brooks, Henri Buccine-Schraeder

Interested in getting younger members involved in your local group? Are you a younger member interested in getting more involved locally? This is the presentation for you! Young people are the way of the future and that’s the direction that we all need to look to. We will discuss ways to get younger members involved, volunteering and participating in areas of leadership within your local group.
3:00 p.m. (Room 214)

Building Your Scholarship Program
Mark Glancey

Your local group misses out on granting a $600 scholarship to an applicant in your area when you don’t participate in the Mensa Foundation’s annual scholarship program. Learn what you can do to develop a scholarship program for your group and how rewarding it can be.
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Who is Al Capone?
Deirdre Marie Capone

“I am a Capone.” So begins Deirdre Marie Capone’s recently published account of her life, family and relationship with one of America’s most notorious gangsters. In the past, this admission of identity did not come easy to Deirdre, who was discriminated against simply because of her last name. Now, she shares little-known stories about the family who raised her and kept Chicago stocked with liquor during the Prohibition. Although Uncle Al passed away in 1947, his legacy — both good and bad — remains with Deirdre. The course of her own life has been affected by the Capone family name, including losing her father to suicide at the age of 10. Over time, the Capone name has become ensconced by myth and legend, but Deirdre alone knows truly intimate details. As the only surviving Capone member who has first hand accounts of interactions with her notorious family members, she seeks to clear up rumors and allegations that have accumulated over the past 80 years.
3:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Unsupervised Play"

Time was when the kids roamed vacant lots or played in the street after school.  Now they have structured activities or sit in front of a screen or get a play date if one can be arranged.  Parents who try the old way run the risk of being accused of child abuse.  What's a modern parent to do?  Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
3:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Five and a Half Years in the Hanoi Hilton: Triumph of the Human Spirit!
Dave Carey

Retired Navy pilot Dave Carey tells the story of how he and his fellow prisoners of war survived more than five years in the prisons of North Vietnam. He analyzes the strengths and strategies that made their survival possible and shows how these forms of faith — in self, others, country and God — can carry everyone through personal and business crises. Capt. Carey brings a positive and up-beat message about being your best — doing your best, using the power we each have. He relates in a down-to-earth yet profound way. Here are keystones to a meaningful life. Stressing that each of us has the opportunity and the power to make every day a little better, in spite of — not because of — the events in our lives. Success not as a result of overcoming adversity, but rather using it creatively. Together, we'll find humor in emotional chaos, the power of humor in our lives and keeping the faith in yourself, others, your country and in God.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Marc Lederman Festivus Airing of Grievances
Brian B. Reeves

Long-time Mensa leader Marc Lederman (chair of this AG) died last December. This event is for Marc’s friends and fans to gather to remember him. Bring tissues and your sense of humor. You will need both as we remember one of Mensa’s most interesting members.
3:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Discovery and Protection of Deep-water Coral Reefs: Vulnerable Deep and Mesophotic Coral/Sponge Ecosystems.
Stephanie Farrington, MSc.

This presentation covers the discovery and protection of deep-sea and mesophotic coral reefs in the northwest Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. It covers the processes for their discovery, including a summary of the deep-water platforms, the type of data collected and the remarkable coral and sponge species that make up these vulnerable habitats, including some that have been shown to fight cancers. Also covered: how we use the extensive research to protect the deep-coral habitats by creating and expanding Marine Protected Areas (MPA) like the Oculina Habitat Area of Particular Concern (HAPC), the first deep-sea coral reef MPA in the world and the Deep-Coral HAPC, the largest deep-water coral reef MPA covering about 24,000 miles just off the coast of Florida. Also possibly covered: our month-long cruise to survey with an ROV the deepwater reefs of Cuba, scheduled for May 2017.
3:00 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Dancing Like They Did on the Silver Screen
Don Jacobs

Learn how to glide across the floor with grace and style. Find out how to do those romantic turns, and feel comfortable and look great when you do it. That’s right. Learn the secrets of dancers like Fred Astaire, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly and Rosemary Clooney, to name a few. No, you won’t look quite like them at the end of the class, but you’ll understand and be able to do the basic techniques that made them look wonderful and will help you look great at the dance. Gain the confidence. Lose the fear. No partners required, just a desire to have fun and meet other Mensans.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Artificial Intelligence — From Yan Shi to Skynet
Timmy King

From the dawn of the written word, mankind has imagined artificial beings capable of human thought and action. In this session, we will stroll through AI history from the automatons of Alexandria, to the Turing test, through the artificial intelligence winters of the late 20th century. Our journey ends with a mind-boggling (and slightly scary) glimpse into the future of AI. Society is on the precipice of a paradigm shift not seen since the borg first began their assimilation of the universe. We'll wrap things up with the important question, "Should we fear Skynet?" The answer may surprise you!
4:30 p.m. (Room 212 & 213)

High Conflict Members and How to Deal With Them
Garrison "Bud" Klueck

High-conflict people present challenges throughout their lives and throughout society. High-conflict people often create problems in their workplace, in their families, and, if they become members of Mensa, to local group leaders and to their fellow Mensans. This session will examine how to distinguish a high-conflict person, how widespread the phenomenon is in American society, and most importantly, what to do about it when there is such an individual in your local group. Techniques to diffuse high-conflict situations will be discussed. Options available to local group leaders will be outlined. Tools, from outside the local group and available to aid the local group leader, will be described.
4:30 p.m. (Room 214)

Public Awareness for Your Local Group
Ruth Green-Waite

Good public relations is important for your Local Group to disseminate information to the public while maintaining a positive image of Mensa. Increasing visibility in your community will not only increase awareness of Mensa in general, but will also help with recruiting new members who may have not previously known that Mensa existed or what it is about. This presentation will talk about some ways to help increase public relations within your Local Group, including suggestions for setting up a successful recruitment table.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Buck Up, Suck Up and Grow Your Membership — Get 'er Done!
Doris Gentry

Gentry is an elected member of the Napa City Council, and her motto is, “Suck up, buck up and get 'er done!” She embodies marketing, promotions and public relations. How does one get elected? The same way you sell lipstick to elephants. It is all about the right product and the right market with the right message. Is your club hemorrhaging members? Want to grow you club and have more fun with your events? We will do some hands-on activities, apply some tricks and learn new ways to kick your club from ordinary to extraordinary.
4:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Non-dualism: Fact or Fiction
Chuck Hillig

There seems to be one common core that lies at the heart of most of the world's great religions and spiritual philosophies. Often called the "perennial truth," this ancient cross-cultural belief holds that all perceived separation is illusory and that, instead, everything that you're experiencing (including the belief in a separated "you"), is, quintessentially, really the same one, unbroken, seamless and all-pervasive Consciousness. Obviously, the implications of what non-dualism is pointing at are far beyond staggering. After all, how can you live in a dream world where you're always questioning the very nature of reality, itself? Who really are you, anyway? So, if you're ready to venture down this cosmic rabbit hole, then come and discover what astounding Truth lies within your own heart-of-hearts.
4:30 p.m. (Room 216)

Poke-M Go (Pokemon) Meetup

Hey Poke-M Goers! We will gather at the AG to meet fellow trainers on our quest for Corsola and Heracross. Maybe we can take down a gym or two together! We will finally put trainer faces to trainer names! I'll bring Wobbuffet. See you there!
4:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Food Fight — Gluten, GMOs, Paleo and C4 Corn"

Doing a dinner party has gotten so difficult now that everyone has their own personal dietary issues. Paleo, Vegan, Adkins, organic, gluten, GMO, allergies/sensitivity, locally-sourced, corn-based (or not), fair-trade, even euphony ("If I can't pronounce it, I won't eat it!") — we have developed an extensive vocabulary of meal-time hot buttons. What's yours and why, or do you just eat what's on the plate? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
4:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Pente Tournament
Alice Silver

Pente was a very popular game of the 1980s. A game of skill, simple to learn and play, Pente can have the tactical depth of chess. Some Mensans play it, others have watch us play at RGs and are eager to learn. Played on a grid with colored stones, two players compete to achieve a straight line of five stones of their own color, or flank and capture five pairs of their opponent’s stones. You can find the basic strategy here: hasbro.com/common/instruct/Pente.PDF or come to the learning session in the Games Room on Thursday at 11 a.m.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

An Ecotourist's Guide to the Everglades and the Florida Keys: See and Experience Southern Florida Like Few Do
Robert Silk

Visits to isolated islands, austere domes of cypress, the world's third-largest coral reef tract, pine forests and the world's most famous wetland are just some of the options that outdoor-minded tourists have when they visit southern Florida. In this presentation, longtime South Florida journalist and adventurer Robert Silk will provide a primer to his book, An Ecotourist's Guide to the Everglades and the Florida Keys. Learn about the best places to view wildlife, hike, paddle, snorkel and much more in the nearly 5 million acres of public land and water of southern Florida. Silk will also discuss the omnipresent tension between development and conservation that has led to the designation of three national parks, five national wildlife refuges, a national preserve, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and 12 state parks in the region.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

The Big Bang Theory: There's Something Funny About Scientists
Dave Zobel

Something astonishing keeps cropping up on TV's The Big Bang Theory — namely, actual science. The hugely popular sitcom, an extended riff on the "gifted and geeky" stereotype, is peppered with real-life scientific references. Characters chat about cutting-edge and classical experiments; historic formulae adorn background whiteboards; and famous science educators guest-star as themselves. So when did CBS become PBS? Science humorist Dave Zobel argues that The Big Bang Theory plays a vital, if non-traditional, role in science education. Its ongoing celebration of scientific inquiry lays the groundwork for viewer conversations about science, technology, math — even philosophy. And that's a gift to every science geek... or science denier.
4:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Deep-sea Corals and Methane Seep Communities of Atlantic Submarine Canyons
Sandra Brooke

Submarine canyons are massive geological features that funnel currents and nutrients between the continental shelf and abyssal plane. Deep-sea canyons are dark, turbid and cold, with strong currents that scour sediments to expose the underlying rocks, which are colonized by extensive communities of deep sea corals and their associates. Atlantic Deepwater Canyons project was a multidisciplinary study of two canyons in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. This presentation will show the results of exploration and research in these massive and remarkable features, including the first descriptions of methane seep communities in the region. Human impacts on these vulnerable natural resources will also be discussed, together with options for their management.
4:30 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Supervised Practice for Dancing Like They Did on the Silver Screen
Don Jacobs

Practice makes perfect. If you want to review what you learned today or have questions, you can get one-on-one answers, even if you weren’t at the class or it’s a question about any other dances.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

The Science of Racial Inequality and a Dream for Racial Equality
Michael Sinegar, Abel Dean

Two young Mensans (one black and one white) make the case for why liberals, not just racists, should accept the taboo science of genetically-rooted psychological racial differences, including intelligence. They want to bust the white nationalist monopoly on a field of biology that is accurate, even if it should be false, as the science can be used for both liberal ends and anti-liberal ends, but denouncing it or ignoring it can only be anti-liberal. It is only by accepting the science that racial equality can ever be achieved. The first hour will be a presentation of the scientific evidence, and the second hour will be a discussion of the related politics. Both of them wish to provoke thought, not umbrage, so please leave your tomatoes in Hospitality.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

How to Tap the Hemingway Within You
Ruth Berge, Prudy Taylor Board

Accomplished author and editor Prudy Taylor Board will share tips from the brand-new second edition of 101+ Tips on How to Write and Sell a First Novel to an agent or publisher. Co-Author Ruth Hartman Berge will share tips from the same book on how to create a market plan that will help the new author successfully sell that book to readers.
6:00 p.m. (Room 216)

Evangelical Christianity Meet & Greet
Larry Paarmann

This is a time for current members of the SIG to meet and greet and get acquainted, and for propective members to see what we are about.  Everyone is welcome.
6:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Did ‘Tobacco Science’ Lead to ‘Climate Science’?"

The idea of scientific integrity took a big hit when we learned that tobacco isn't safe despite what some scientists said. Is the public justified in doubting the evidence for global warming because science seems to be for sale? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

House of Slaves and ‘Door of No Return’
Edmund Abaka Ph.D

The slave dungeons and forts/castles along the coast of Ghana constitute the fulcrum around which the Atlantic slave trade was organized. It was also an important part of the Middle Passage, but scholars of the slave trade have done very little work on these structures. How do continental Africans and diaspora Africans view these structures?
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Possession: The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking
Murray Silver

America's leading parapsychologist returns to the AG after a seven-year hiatus to report his latest findings on spirit and possession. Silver's appearance on the Travel Channel's Ghost Adventures: Moon River Brewery in 2009 is one of the top three episodes in the show's nine-year history. His recent appearance on Ghost Adventures Aftershocks elevated the medium to a new level. Silver's long-awaited thesis on spirit was pulled from publication rather than encourage the perilous hobby of "ghost hunting." Thus, this program will be the only opportunity for an audience to hear his groundbreaking revelations guaranteed to put the fear of God in people who do not believe in God.
6:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

When Cops Become Robbers: The Rise of Civil Forfeiture
Justin Pearson

Many Americans are surprised to learn that laws exist that allow the police to take your money and property and keep it for themselves, even without arresting anyone or accusing anyone of committing any crime. This process is called civil forfeiture, and it has become the most glaring abuse of property rights in America today. Unlike criminal forfeiture, civil forfeiture incentivizes law enforcement to ignore criminal activity in favor of chasing money and property instead. The result is rampant abuse, countless innocent victims and less actual crime fighting. This presentation will explore the history of civil forfeiture in the United States, the reasons why the Supreme Court allows it to persist and the reform efforts that are currently underway.
6:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Risk Terrain Modeling Q&A
Henri Buccine-Schraeder

Risk terrain modeling (RTM) is an approach to spatial risk analysis that is used to identify risks that come from features of a landscape and model how they co-locate to create unique behavior settings for crime and other risky behaviors. Come hear about the basics of this innovative method used in police departments all over the world by one of the experts in this methodology. This will be followed by an interactive discussion about the adaptability of the method, previous policing interventions and the appeal of RTM across a variety of disciplines.
7:00 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Under-21 Dance
DJ Rockin' Roy

Just for our attendees under the age of 21 – enjoy DJ Rockin’ Roy as he plays a wide range of classic dance favorites.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

LGBTQ Health Policy and Sexuality: Surviving in the Age of Trump (Adults Only)
Steven Patton, Kelly Shibari, Jen Laws

Since the HIV epidemic of the '80s, public health policy has had to consciously consider the lives and sexuality of the LGBTQ communities. The last 30 years has been both reflective of and influential to LGBTQ sexual expression and the evolution of social understanding of gender identity. Historically, public health policy has, to some degree or another, include the unique needs of these marginalized communities and substantially shape the cultural expression of gender and sexuality. We’ll discuss what’s happened for the LGBTQ community in terms of culture, health and sexual expression since the 2016 election.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

Israel: The Historical Holyland
Yair Nabet

Israel, the historical holy land, lies at the intersection of three continents and the histories of their civilizations. The earliest fossils of modern human teeth have been found in Israel, at the caves of Quesem. The land defines its history — a landscape that determined the course of human habitation there, not to mention the outcomes of battles fought on land and sea throughout recorded history. This pictoral presentation will describe the ancient to modern development of the land and its inhabitants, its archeology and artifacts, respecting the cultural and religious differences throughout the millenia. Through understanding the land and its history, we learn how this tiny slice of earth magnifies its impact on the world stage. A basic travelogue with illuminating pictorals, yet of a special place that cannot escape its historical destiny. Discover the holy land with your own eyes. Questions welcomed at the end and answered from personal experiences.
7:30 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Equity Crowdfunding — Exciting New Funding Programs Recently Legalized
Charles Radley

After the 1929 stock market crash, the Congress passed the Securities and Exchange Act of 1933 and made it all but impossible for small companies to raise money by public offering of securities. In 2016 that changed, and new law allows limited sale of securities to the public up to $1 million per year, domestically. Also, most states have new legislation which allows public offerings which do not cross state lines. Companies can raise up to $1 Million per year in an SEC-licensed Reg-CF public offering of securities only via licensed crowdfunding portals. This is not Kickstarter. You can keep 100% control by selling non-voting stock or bonds. By contrast, angel investors and VCs typically demand a large equity stake and even controlling interest in the company. The SEC rules allow for any type of security to be sold, like bonds, debt instruments, stocks, warrants, debentures or anything else. One can even invent new securities, like revenue sharing notes.
7:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Has the Regulatory State Gone Too Far?"

Do you believe that federal regulations are an affront to personal freedom? Will the free market's Invisible Hand be an adequate defense against corporate overreach? If not, what then? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
7:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Boggle Tournament
Charles Godfrey

Boggle is a three-minute word-search game. We will be playing on a five-by-five grid with a minimum word length of four letters, using the normal scoring rules. Boards are printed and distributed for each round, so that each person is working on the same board.  Please arrive at least five minutes early for table assignments.
7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Cyber Threats and Homeland Security
Leo Doyle

Leo Doyle is head of the Cyber Defense Force for the city of Indianapolis, part of the Homeland Security Bureau. Cyber terrorism is a threat to all of us, whether we know it or not. It can happen almost anywhere, any time. Doyle will present some recently declassified events and talk about the dark underbelly of the Internet where there are no rules, no laws and organized crime and gangs meet to do their business. People don't ordinarily see and can't find this "Deep Web" without special software. He will talk about some of the specialized training that he and his team have been through.
8:00 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Battle of the SIGs Challenge
Nancy Farrar

Come one, come all to see who will take home the bragging rights for 2017-2018!  Prepare to be amazed  – and cheer on your favorite SIGs (Special Interest Groups)  –  as they compete in the inaugural Battle of the SIGs contest.  Participating SIGs will be putting on a performance package for your enjoyment, while they are also competing in win the Battle of the SIGs traveling trophy, their choice of one of two prizes and, of course, those most important bragging rights.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

BDSM: Sexual Power Dynamics and Play in Relationships (Adults Only)
Elizabeth 'Kitty' Davis, BA, Kelly Shibari

Discussing fantasies, sexual needs, wants and desires can be difficult and tongue-tying. Broaching topics and maintaining relationships involving dominance and submission, sadomasochistic play and fetishes can be even more challenging. Yet, doing so provides an opportunity for deeper communication and more intimacy. BDSM and fetish play offer many layers and possibilities of engagement from one-off to long-term, sexual and non-sexual, casual and intimate, playful and spiritual. What options are available? How do you manage kink-based relationships over the long term? What are the benefits to hiring a professional? This discussion will cover relationship structures, pacing relationship development, communication styles, recognizing natural power dynamics and their impact on communication, playing against type and "switching" in one or multiple relationships, developing new relationship skills with broad application outside of play space, and the personal politics of change.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

The Role of Pardons and Clemency, Sentence Commutation in Today's Criminal Justice System
Vicki Hutchinson

More than 65 million Americans have a criminal record and thousands are incarcerated each year with sentences disproportionate to the criminal behavior. For individuals with criminal records problems bleed from criminal into civil and have economic and social ripple effects that last beyond any sentence. A criminal record affects employment, housing, licensing and immigration — areas that impact not only the person convicted of the crime but also their families. Even short periods of incarceration can have a lifelong impact on individuals and their families. They are saddled with an economic death sentence long after the sentence is completed. Pardons and commutation of sentences play an important role in the criminal justice system by enabling many individuals to remove this economic death sentence and go on to live productive, crime free lives. Presentation will focus on how and why these programs are granted.
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Music Listening in the 21st Century: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Scott Vinick

It's 2017 and you want to rock out to "Dark Side of the Moon" or mellow out to "Kind of Blue." What are your options? You've got your CDs, your MP3s, 44 and 96, 192 and 320, SACD, FLAC, WAV, AAC, PONO and millenials are listening to these things called LPs again — OMG! We'll navigate the stormy sea of battling streams, volume wars and killed-off technologies to give you some practical information about getting the most out of your modern audio experience.
9:00 p.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

The Mystic Experience – Intrinsic Meaning and Indications as to the Nature of Human Consciousness
Thomas Nehrer

While in San Diego to speak at the AG in 2016, I presented to the local group of the Institute of Noetic Sciences a tribute to Edgar Mitchell – the sixth astronaut to walk on the moon and founder of IONS. I looked at the Mystic Experience as Mitchell had had while in space returning from the moon and as I experienced as a young man hitch-hiking around Europe. That same perspective should be of great interest to Ms. I'll first show the 20-minute video I produced on the topic (youtube.com/watch?v=ZAqQY5tomn0),  and then continue to delve into implications of the Mystic Experience as indications of the nature of human consciousness. This involves recognizing how beliefs and accepted definitions distort perception. And it will illustrate the functional oneness of self with experienced reality, an awareness of which is masked by common notions — religious, scientific and traditional (luck, fate, etc.) — as to causality.
9:00 p.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

He Does Whatever a Spider Can: A History of the Amazing Spider-Man
Fraser Sherman

Introduced in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy 15, Spider-Man was an overnight sensation and eventually Marvel's #1 character. In addition to multiple comics, he's appeared in a daily newspaper strip, movies, novels, cartoons and a prime-time TV series. This program will look at his history now spanning more than five decades, including backstage feuds, changes to the strip, and the key to his tremendous popularity, as well as his appearances in other media.
9:00 p.m. (Great Hall 1 & 2)

Everybody Dance
DJ Rockin' Roy

DJ Rockin’ Roy is an award winning multi-talented DJ that will get you on your feet and moving for the last party night of the Annual Gathering.
9:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 4)

Werewolves of Ziggy Hollow
Bill Zigo

Werewolves have moved into the peaceful village of Ziggy Hollow, and it is up to the townspeople to kill them before they get killed. Ziggy's rules and special characters will be introduced before the start of each game. Adults only please.
9:00 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "Welcome to the Police State — Feeling Safer Now?"

The police can use a license-plate reader to find your stolen car, and they can know where you drove last night. Security officials can tap the communications of terrorists, and of opposition politicians. Ben Franklin said we can have freedom or safety but not both. Where would you draw the line? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
9:00 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Carnelli Tournament
Dan Tobias

Play this title-association game, invented by Mensans Jan Carnell and Jim Lange. See why this game has been popular at Mensa gatherings for decades. No experience necessary; rules will be taught. Visit the website is.gd/carnelli for more information, or just show up.
10:30 p.m. (Diplomat Ballroom 5)

Debate Room: "‘Public Land’ or ‘Government Land’?"

Are the U.S. National Parks the public’s land or the government’s land? By what right does the government assert control over park and monument acreage, and by what right do citizens demand access to that same land for private purposes? Who is overreaching? Debate Room is not a heated debate, but a fast-paced moderated discussion where everyone gets to be heard, and the most interesting speaker gets a prize!
10:30 p.m. (Great Hall 6)

Double Deck Cancellation Hearts Tournament — Final Round
Stan Ward

One of the signature games of Mensa and Hell’s M’s, DDCH is Hearts played with seven to nine players and two decks, where a matching card played cancels out the first one for purposes of taking the trick. Lead rotates, no need to wait for hearts to be broken, no score setbacks, no “bucket-O-pain”. If none of that means anything to you, the full rules will be explained; if it does, this variant is often called “guts rules” or “Ohio rules”. Sign up in advance or show up to replace a no-show. One winner from each of eight tables goes on to the final round.

Sunday, July 9

9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 2)

Becoming a Cultural Genius
Srikant Mantravadi

The world in which we live is getting smaller. As we come together, Mensans can be on the cutting edge of bringing people together, rather than tearing each other apart. The key to this can be cultural awareness. If we can find common ground using our intelligence and our ability to make connections, we can bringing the togetherness this world desperately lacks. Learn and discuss how to use religion, shared values, food, family and other cultural factors to find that common ground. You have a lot in common with others all over the world. We have to find out how to talk to one another but, more importantly, how to really listen. I think there are tried and true methods we all can work on to get to the things that bring us together. You will be the hit of every party and an agent for positive change.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

How We Listen to the Thing We Call Music
Anthony Sarain

What is considered music is culturally based and has evolved over time. The same sound palette can elicit happiness or disgust, depending on the cultural reference point. In addition, the way humans listen to music has also evolved. This evolution has changed the importance of different musical instruments, including the voice. This presentation will include many audio samples to illustrate the continuing evolution of music and listening.
9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

So! Where Does Your Food Come From?
Margaret Merrill

Most of us live with the American industrial food system, whether we pay attention to it or not. Besides, what serious alternatives do we have anyway? "Local food" crops up in the news and conversation much more commonly now than 10 years ago. If this is an alternative — what is it and what does it offer consumers? Is there any real reason to buy local food rather than the more convenient grocery store food? You might be surprised. Come find out.
9:00 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

9/11 — A Posteriori
Donald Stahl

This paper is under consideration for presentation at the next meeting of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Society. It is a philosophical approach to 9/11 via sensory experience.
9:00 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Chasing the Enterprise: How Star Trek's Vision of a Humanistic Future Can Be Achieved
Scott Robinson

Gene Roddenberry's vision of an ideal humanistic future was played out in Star Trek, and that vision is still endearing 50 years later. But while some find that vision unrealistic and unachievable, the fact is that there are hints of humankind's future potential in our Paleolithic past.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 1)

Beale's Cipher: Code or Humanitarian Oroject?
Charles McCollum

Beale's Cipher was a cipher describing treasures brought back from the west by Thomas Jefferson Beale in the early 1800s. It is famous in cryptographic circles as an example of a book cipher, consisting of three pages with numbers. The second page was deciphered, after great effort, with the Declaration of Independence. But, was it really a description of an early expedition to the west, or a scam?
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 3)

Hiss & Kiss
LaRae Bakerink, Heather Poirier

Come close out the 2017 Annual Gathering!  Did we do something that sucked?  Did you really enjoy something specific this year?  We really want to know both the good and the bad so we know what to do more or less of next year.
10:30 a.m. (Room 216)

M-LDS SIG Meet-and-Greet
Jessica Mathews

Worship service conducted by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. One Sunday each month, in connection with optional fasting and prayer on behalf of the needy, LDS members sing hymns, partake of the sacrament (bread and water) if appropriate and are invited to share their testimonies of the gospel of Jesus Christ, as the Spirit moves. All are welcome. Reverence requested.
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 2)

The Scientific Search for Life in the Universe
James R. Webb

This lecture explores the current state of the scientific search for extraterrestrial life. It includes background so the audience will understand why and how serious scientists attack this important topic. I will discuss life on Earth, the search for radio waves from extraterrestrial civilizations and the problem of UFOs. All topics are discussed in a scientific context including the latest information and observations.
10:30 a.m. (Atlantic Ballroom 3)

Developing the Moon with a Lunar Space Elevator
Charles Radley

A Lunar Space Elevator [LSE] can be built today from existing commercial polymers manufactured, launched and deployed for less than $2B. A prototype weighing 48 tons with 100-kg payload can be launched by three Falcon-Heavy's, and will pay for itself in 50 sample return cycles. It reduces the cost of soft landing on the moon at least threefold and sample return at least ninefold. Many benefits would arise. A near side LSE can mine valuable resources and ship to market in cislunar space, low Earth orbit and Earth’s surface. A far-side LSE can support a super sensitive radio astronomy facility.
10:30 a.m. (Regency Ballroom 1)

Red Brains, Blue Brains: The Neuroscience of Donald Trump
Scott Robinson

The neuroscience of sociopolitical choice was the subject of my previous presentation (2016); this talk will focus on the specific cognitive features that made Donald Trump an attractive presidential choice to millions, with attention to his own unique style of reasoning and decision-making.